Tuscan-themed Palio Khao Yai getting new owner, new concept? #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation.

Tuscan-themed Palio Khao Yai getting new owner, new concept?

Shopping

Jul 07. 2020

By The Nation

Palio Khao Yai, a picturesque shopping centre in Nakhon Ratchasima, is now rumoured to be closed after reportedly suffering from the impact of the Covid-19 crisis since March.

The centre is possibly being renovated to woo more visitors or is being taken over by a new owner. Popular Facebook page RetailMan said “a new capitalist is planning a new concept for Palio”.

Meanwhile, Palio’s official page has remained silent. Its last message, posted in March, said every business had to adjust to survive.

However, Tops Daily inside the Tuscan-themed village is still open to customers.

Fashion goes wild on Lazada, Shopee this weekend #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation.

Fashion goes wild on Lazada, Shopee this weekend

Shopping

Jul 03. 2020

In a bid to boost spending, consumer goods distributor ICC International is launching the “Saha Group Fair Online Year 2020” via online marketplaces Lazadaand Shopee, at which fashionistas will be able to pick up great deals with discounts of up to 70 per cent.

The event, which runs until Sunday (July 5), has famous brands like Elle Homme, Becky Russel, ITOKIN and MINNA among others offering special discounts only for this event.

Enjoy the rainbow colours of Pride Month at CentralWorld #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation.

Enjoy the rainbow colours of Pride Month at CentralWorld

Shopping

Jun 25. 2020

By The Nation

Top brands at CentralWorld are celebrating gender diversity by offering special collections to mark Pride Month:

• Adidas’ new Pride Collection 2020 is made special by colours of the rainbow, signifying LGBTQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex and asexual).

• Guss Damn Good has launched two new ice cream flavours, Equality and Love.

• Calvin Klein’s new Lifewear Limited Edition, features T-shirts, hoodies, shorts, jeans as well as sportswear in pride colours.

• Swatch is marking the Pride Month with the #OPENSUMMER rainbow watch.

• Guess has teamed up with Colombian reggae star J Balvin to create the colourful Guess x J Balvin ‘Colores’ collection.

• Levi’s new Pride 2020 collection features the message “Use Your Voice” in rainbow colours to support equal rights. All revenue from this collection will go to the OutRight Action International.

Hong Kong dealer woos Thai car fans with diecast models #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation.

Hong Kong dealer woos Thai car fans with diecast models

Shopping

Jun 17. 2020

By The Nation

A Hong Kong model company, Tiny, is catering to high demand from car lovers for diecast models, including models of special significance to Thai fans.

Tiny has appointed Hong Kong Select to be its official agency.

Most of the models made by this brand are various cars that can be seen on the streets of Hong Kong, but they have also added diecast models of exciting cars from all over the world.

Diecast models have been gaining in popularity since the 1970s. Most of the buyers are collectors fascinated with the beauty and realistic details incorporated in a compact car that is commonly produced in a 1/64 ratio.

To reinforce the popularity of diecast cars in Thailand, Tiny is offering two legendary race cars — the Inno 64 – 1/64 Nissan Skyline GT-R BNR32 #83 and the Inno 64 – 1/64 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution III #2.

INNO 64 - 1/64 NISSAN SKYLINE GT-R BNR32 #83 “AIM MOTORSPORT” JTC Fuji 500KM 1992

INNO 64 – 1/64 NISSAN SKYLINE GT-R BNR32 #83 “AIM MOTORSPORT” JTC Fuji 500KM 1992

The Nissan Skyline is a model of the race car driven by Pruttirat Rattanakun Seriroengrit who competed in the 1992 Japan Touring Car Championship. It comes in bright red, which is a favourite of many racers because of its power and beauty.

INNO 64 - 1/64 MITSUBISHI LANCER EVOLUTION III #2“ ”SINGHA RALLIART“ ”Rally of Thailand 1995 Winner

INNO 64 – 1/64 MITSUBISHI LANCER EVOLUTION III #2“ ”SINGHA RALLIART“ ”Rally of Thailand 1995 Winner

The second model, the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution III, was the racing car of the Mitsubishi Rallyart World Rally team. The driver, Tommi Mäkinen, won the Rally of Thailand in 1995. The car uses a white-yellow tone, the colours of the main sponsors.

In addition to the exteriors, the company said it had devoted a lot of attention to the interior too, from the car console, the steering wheel, to the racing seat.

Both cars were scheduled to be launched and sold at the Thailand Toy Expo on April 30 but due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the event was cancelled. Both models are now available at the Hong Kong Select online store. There are only 1,200 products in stock.

Collectors can check it out on Shopee: https://shopee.co.th/hongkongselect?smtt=0.0.9 and Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/hkcthai/

Want a green Valentine’s Day gift? Don’t buy chocolate. Or roses. #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30381986?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Want a green Valentine’s Day gift? Don’t buy chocolate. Or roses.

Feb 12. 2020
By The Washington Post · Sarah Kaplan
In terms of carbon footprint, which is best to give my partner for Valentine’s Day: chocolate or roses?

Before I offer romantic advice to strangers on the internet, I should probably disclose that I once wrote an entire article arguing that birds are the best lovers. I am not exactly the world’s greatest dating guru (much to my mother’s chagrin).

But I do know a thing or two about climate change. And if you’re concerned about greenhouse gas emissions and their role in heating the planet, you won’t love what I’m about to say.

It takes quite a bit of carbon to get both chocolate and roses from farm fields into your sweetheart’s hands. In West Africa, where two-thirds of the world’s cocoa is produced, the chocolate industry is associated with rampant deforestation. Meanwhile, most roses sold in the United States are grown in Colombia, then transported to the U.S. by cargo jets and delivered to stores in refrigerated trucks – a process that requires burning huge amounts of fossil fuels.

Last year, my colleagues at The Washington Post traveled to Ivory Coast to talk with farmers who grow cocoa for major candy companies. Many were just barely eking out a living – the state-owned monopoly had recently slashed prices – and were forced to cut trees and clear brush to expand their plots. Ivory Coast has lost 80% of its forests over the past 50 years; much of that destruction is a consequence of desperate farmers and consumer demand.

The consequences for the planet can be severe. Healthy tropical forests are one of Earth’s most powerful mechanisms for pulling carbon out of the air; the Amazon alone absorbs as much as 2 billion tons of carbon dioxide every year, about 5% of annual emissions from human activities.

But when those trees are felled and left to rot, they become carbon sources. According to the Woods Hole Research Center, deforestation accounts for 10% of annual carbon dioxide emissions.

Candy companies like Mars – the creator of Snickers, M&Ms and Twix – vowed in 2009 to make all their products with sustainable cocoa. But the 2020 target for that switch has come and gone; now the company is aiming for 2025.

Meanwhile, government efforts to stop human activities in protected forests are hobbled by corruption and, according to watchdog groups, have led to human rights violations. And certification firms, which work to ensure that cocoa is child labor- and deforestation-free, have found major lapses in their monitoring efforts. Last year, The Washington Post reported that leading chocolate certification company Utz discovered more than 4,900 cocoa farms located inside national protected forests in Ivory Coast.

On the opposite side of the Atlantic,in the Colombian greenhouses that produce the majority of America’s roses, the problem isn’t so much how the plants are grown as what happens once they’re picked.

In the weeks leading up to Feb. 14, 30 cargo jets carrying a million flowers each make a daily trip from Colombia to Miami. The nonprofit International Council on Clean Transportation estimated that these flights alone emit about 360,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide, equaling the average annual emissions from more than 40,000 American homes.

The roses must be kept at near-freezing temperatures to prevent them from wilting, so the trucks that transport them across the country must be heavily refrigerated. According to a 2018 study in the journal Transportation Research, temperature control in a cooled freight truck accounts for 40% of its emissions.

The complexity of the supply chains for both products makes it hard to estimate their carbon footprints, let alone directly compare them. But it should be pretty clear by now that, speaking generally, neither is particularly green.

So, what’s an eco-conscious lovebird to do? You can look for chocolate that has been certified by an auditing organization like Rainforest Alliance – though these certifications are sometimes flawed. You can buy native flowers that have been grown near your home, which don’t need to be flown long distances or produced in energy-intensive hothouses.

Best of all, you could give the only gift that actually takes carbon out of the atmosphere, by planting a tree in their honor. According to one U.S. Forest Service study, an urban sugar maple sequesters more than 7,000 pounds of carbon dioxide by the time it turns 60. It’s a message of love that actively fights climate change – and what’s more romantic than that?

Preparing for the Year of the Rat #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30380801?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Preparing for the Year of the Rat

Jan 20. 2020
By The Nation

Yaowarat Road is bustling with activity as Thai people of Chinese ancestry prepare themselves to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Thais and foreign tourists can be seen buying fruits, new clothes and lanterns to decorate their houses that are the symbols of good fortune.

Preparing for the Year of the Rat #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30380802?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Preparing for the Year of the Rat

Jan 20. 2020
By The Nation

Yaowarat Road is bustling with activity as Thai people of Chinese ancestry prepare themselves to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Thais and foreign tourists can be seen buying fruits, new clothes and lanterns to decorate their houses that are the symbols of good fortune.

Preparing for the Year of the Rat #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30380799?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Preparing for the Year of the Rat

Jan 20. 2020
By The Nation

Yaowarat Road is bustling with activity as Thai people of Chinese ancestry prepare themselves to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Thais and foreign tourists can be seen buying fruits, new clothes and lanterns to decorate their houses that are the symbols of good fortune.

Bargains galore at Seacon SME fest #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30379866?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Bargains galore at Seacon SME fest

Dec 26. 2019
By The Nation

The public is invited to shop for bargains at “The Best SMEs Gift Fest” event being held from today (December 26) to January 5 at the North Terrace of Robinson zone on the first floor of Seacon Square on Srinakarin Road.

Organised by the shopping mall in collaboration with the SME D Bank and the Ministry of Industry, it offers a wide range of products and discounts of up to 70 per cent at 5.30pm every day along with interesting activities organised by SME entrepreneurs.

The SME D Bank booth will also offer loan services for a maximum Bt5 million with low interest starting at 0.44 per cent a month for individual and juristic persons.

Entrepreneur are invited to register products on e-commerce platforms such as Lazada and Thailandpostmart.com.

Walking Street promotes Thai handmade products #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30379734?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Walking Street promotes Thai handmade products

Dec 23. 2019
By The Nation

1,869 Viewed

The Walking Street@Silom event organised by the ministries of Commerce and Culture is now wooing customers to take a look at Thai traditional handmade products from 30 brands.

Line Kram Saruda is one of 30 brands offering tie-dyeing shirts created by Saruda Kantawong, an artist and dyeing teacher, and Sirapob Boonsuk, a graphic designer.

Saruda said that her dyeing style is called Shibori, using rocks to make colour patterns. They have both taught their dyeing techniques for 3-4 years, charging only Bt2,500-3,500.

Maka Brand created by Suchada Khlongnakrop, a former programer, has received four stars from One Tambon One Product. The shop sells bags, baskets and key rings. All products are decorated with animal-shaped leather.

Maka also has hemp fabric hats and keychains, which have drawn the attention of foreign tourists.

Ban Nok Hook (House of Owls) provides fancy keychains in the shape of an owl, a lucky mascot for Japanese people. The brand was named after traditional network communities in Chom Thong district, Bangkok.

Donlapak Thanapan, owner of Ban Nok Hook, wants to distribute the income to communities and decided to hire the elderly to help assemble various parts of keychains.

The products have got very good responses, so the shop is expanding into a new product lines such as key covers, bags and T-shirts.

By Grandmama (Thai Dessert Soap by Grandmama) sells soap products that look like Thai desserts and tells their history.

The owner of the brand, Rungpailin Pinyokaew, chooses only natural ingredients to make soaps as she used to make for her family, bringing joy to her family.

The Ministry of Culture rewarded By Grandmama as the best product from Ratchaburi province in 2019.