Movie

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Yes, another teen movie

Published June 16, 2019 by SoClaimon

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http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30371084

Yes, another teen movie

movie & TV June 14, 2019 01:00

By THE NATION

Sophai Lillis from “It” and “Sharp Objects” is to lead Netflix’s new supernatural coming-of-age series “I Am Not Okay With This”, the streaming service announced this week.

From Jonathan Entwistle, creator/director of “The End of the F***ing World” and the producers of “Stranger Things”, the series is based on the Charles Forsman graphic novel. “I Am Not Okay With This” is an irreverent origin story, following a teenage girl navigating the trials and tribulations of high school, all while dealing with the complexities of her family, her budding sexuality, and mysterious superpowers just beginning to awaken from deep within her.

 

Lillis will play Sydney an awkward and smart teen with a dry, witty, sardonic sense of humour. Like many teenagers, she hates high school, doesn’t get along with her mum, and her best friend has a boyfriend she abhors. Though she views herself as painfully average, she is far from it, as she discovers she has telekinetic powers that may prove to be problematic.

Also appearing in the series are Wyatt Oleff who plays Stanley Barber, Sydney’s neighbour and an uncool geek, and Sofia Bryant as Dina, Sydney’s effervescent, happy, pretty, loud and funny, badass best friend. Unfortunately, Dina has a boyfriend  a super jock who Sydney hates  and Sydney worries he’s going to take her away.

Aidan Wojtak-Hissong and Richard Ellis will play recurring parts as Sydney’s brother Liam (Wojtak-Hissong) and Dina’s boyfriend (Brad Lewis).

Production now has begun in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and the series will be released next year.

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The things we leave behind

Published June 13, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370973

"Thee Trong Nan Me Chan Rue Plao" ("Where We Belong") tells the story of Sue (Jennis Oprasert) who is going to study abroad and has one week left to clear things up before leaving her hometown.
“Thee Trong Nan Me Chan Rue Plao” (“Where We Belong”) tells the story of Sue (Jennis Oprasert) who is going to study abroad and has one week left to clear things up before leaving her hometown.

The things we leave behind

movie & TV June 13, 2019 01:00

By Parinyaporn Pajee
The Nation

A new movie by Kongdej Jaturanrasmee explores the uncertainties felt by teenagers in this day and age

With eight of the cast from the membership of idol group BNK48, two of them in the leading roles, movie-goers could be forgiven for thinking that Kongdej Jaturanrasmee’s latest film “Thee Trong Nan Me Chan Rue Plao” (“Where We Belong”) is a BNK48 movie about the friendships between adolescent girls.

Hardcore fans of the director, however, will know that Kongdej’s inimitable signature will be on the story and that it will be well worth watching no matter what the genre.

Coming to cinemas next Thursday, “Where We Belong” is centred on Sue (Jennis Oprasert) who is spending her last week in her hometown of Chantaburi before leaving for Finland. She’s won a scholarship to study there and accepted it without telling her father. The two argued over her decision and haven’t talked since.

Sue, who has never been aboard before, packs her luggage with the help of her friend Belle (Praewa “Music” Suthamphong) and makes a list of things she has to do before leaving. These include returning the comic books she borrowed a long time ago to going to Bangkok with her mother to organise her finances as well as apologising to her friend Mew.

 

“Thee Trong Nan Me Chan Rue Plao” (“Where We Belong”) tells the story of Sue (Jennis Oprasert) who is going to study abroad and has one week left to clear things up before leaving her hometown.

Sue is mature enough to realise that no matter whether she gets through all the things on her checklist or not, she has to let go of her former life. The small town, so familiar to her, will change – all except the memories Sue and Belle share. So what will Sue leave behind and what will she take with her?

The director laughs when asked whether his style will be outshone by the fame of these young idols. And a brief watch of the trailer immediately puts such worries to rest.

 

“Thee Trong Nan Me Chan Rue Plao” (“Where We Belong”) tells the story of Sue (Jennis Oprasert) who is going to study abroad and has one week left to clear things up before leaving her hometown.

“It’s like the other movies I’ve made lately. This is not a complicated plot but it portrays everyday life. In this film, Sue is not choosing to study overseas because she wants to find a better place to live. She simply no longer fits at home,” says the director.

This, he adds, is common among the young generation no matter the country in which they live. “When the whole world is in front of them on a smartphone, it’s tough, far more so than it was when I was their age. They always feel they are not good enough because they see on the social networks that other people of their age seem to be doing a lot better. That makes them disappointed in themselves. Being a teenager is more of a burden now that it was in the past,” he says.

Like his previous films, the idea grew from his innermost thoughts on the subject and when the BNK48 office contacted him about making a movie, the vague plot became a reality.

 

BNK48 members in “Where We Belong”.

“I haven’t felt I fitted in anywhere for years except when I go home. It’s not a bad thing – just a feeling I have,” he says. And, as the father of teenage twin daughters, such thoughts have become more pressing.

“They are 14 now and at the age of transition. They have many questions about everything. I’m with them everyday and I can clearly see that that their generation really reflects that sense of not belonging,”

 

Sue accepted the scholarship without telling anyone – even her father (played by the veteran actor Khajornsak Ratananisai) – which has put a severe strain on their relationship.

“Their teenage anxiety became my fuel for writing this story. And with them growing up, I am interested in their relationships with their girlfriends. It’s like that for Sue and Belle: they have their favourite friends, they are confused about the small things and can’t necessarily find the answers. In this film, the question is not about Sue searching for a place where she belongs but, on the contrary, seeing why she can no longer live here. A thread that runs through the story is the question of how much we own our lives in Thai society – for instance, why girls have to wear their hair short to comply with school rules,” he says.

The project was born when Jirat Bawornwatana, chief executive and executive producer of the BNK48 office, asked Kongdej to make a movie starring members of BNK48.

Jirat, who worked with EGV multiplex and Rose Video Company, approached Kongdej after watching and loving his film “Snap”.

“He told me that the budget wasn’t that high, he wanted to see BNK girls in my film and he wouldn’t interfere in the filmmaking, so the conditions were perfect for me,” he laughs.

Kongdej is known as a multitasker. He wrote the screenplays for the remake of South Korean film “The Letter”, the action blockbuster “Tom Yum Goong” (“The Protector”) and “Me … Myself”.

He also worked with local studios, codirecting “Sayew” (2003) with former school friend Kiat Songsanan, 2005’s “Cherm” (“Midnight My Love”) and 2008’s “Kod” (“Handle Me with Care”) (2008) before switching to independent films with his producer Soros Sukhum. His 2011 film “Tae Peang Phoo Deaw”(“P047”) premiered in the Orizzonti at Venice International Film Festival and his follow up, 2013’s “Tang Wong” was shown at the Berlin International Film Festival 2013 and won Best Picture and Best Director at the Thailand National Film Association Awards,

In 2014, he was asked by cable provider TrueVisions to chronicle the lives of the young novices portrayed in a TV series. Kongdej made it in his own way and the film, titled “So Be It”, went on to premiere at The Berlin International Film Festival 2015 in the Generation K-plus section. “Snap” (2015) was another festival favourite, selected for the main competition of that year’s Tokyo International Film Festival.

 

Director Kongdej Jaturanrasmee directs Jennis on the set.

“All I knew about BNK48 prior to starting the project was that they were a popular girl group. Now I know everything about the BNK universe,” he laughs.

“Even though they are idols and I was contacted to make the film by their boss, I looked at them as actresses and cast them based on their fit to the characters.”

The script won the CJ Entertainment award of $10,000 at the Busan International Fillm Festival’s Asian Project Market last year, which comes with a first-look option for production, investment, sales and distribution.

The director adds that the collaboration with BNK48 has resulted in plenty of feedback from their fan club,

“When the promotional materials was released, they responded with surprised. I enjoy reading their comments and can’t wait to see what they will think of the movie. For my fans, I believe that they won’t be disappointed because I am pretty sure that it is still my movie style they like,” he says.

The man behind the porn

Published June 13, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30371015

The man behind the porn

movie & TV June 13, 2019 01:00

By THE NATION

The story of the filmmaker/writer and actor Toru Muranishi who revolutionised the Japanese adult video (AV) industry during the 1980s is the subject of a new original scripted series called “The Naked Director”, which will release on Netflix on August 8.

The series is based on Nobuhiro Motohashi’s non-fiction book Zenra Kantoku (“The Naked Director”) and will chronicle Muranishi’s unusual and dramatic life filled with big ambitions as well as spectacular setbacks in his attempt to turn Japan’s porn industry on its head.

Playing the title role will be maverick actor Takayuki Yamada, a veteran of Japanese films and TV shows such as “Train Man” (2005), “Crows Zero” (2007), “Ushijima the Loan Shark” (2010), and “Lessons of the Evil” (2012).

Masaharu Take, director of the acclaimed “100 Yen Love” (2016), will serve as director.

“When Netflix approached me about telling the story of Toru Muranishi, his entourage, and the 1980’s, I was drawn to this provocative, daring project. I was reminded of some of the most stimulating, embarrassing, enjoyable, and misguided days of my life,” said the director.

“Together with some of the foremost cast and crew in Japan today we hope to create an ode to the provocative trailblazers of this industry and tell the shocking tale of their unlikely rise to fame. It’s a rousing story we’re proud to tell, all set amongst a meticulous portrait of one of the most frenzied eras in the country’s history.”

“We are confident that this complex portrait of Toru Muranishi’s wild, larger-than-life pursuit of freedom and success is something that will resonate not only in Japan, but with audiences across the world. This series will capture a unique and fascinating era in Japanese history, while exploring themes about sex, society and the individual that are more relevant than ever,” added John Derderian, Director of Content Acquisition at Netflix.

Netflix gets the dinos

Published June 13, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370884

Netflix gets the dinos

movie & TV June 11, 2019 11:15

By The Nation

DreamWorks Animation announced last week that “Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous”, an animated action-adventure series, is set to debut globally on Netflix in 2020 as part of an ongoing multi-year agreement with Netflix to produce original animated kids and family programming.

Set within the same timeline as the 2015 blockbuster film, “Jurassic World”, the Netflix original series is inspired by the multi-billion-dollar franchise from Universal Pictures and Amblin Entertainment.

“Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous” follows a group of six teenagers chosen for a once-in-a-lifetime experience at a new adventure camp on the opposite side of Isla Nublar. But when dinosaurs wreak havoc across the island, the campers are stranded. Unable to reach the outside world, they’ll need to go from strangers to friends to family if they’re going to survive.

“Jurassic World: Camp Cretaceous” builds on a successful five-year relationship between DreamWorks Animation and Netflix that has seen 18 original series debut on the service, including the “Tales of Arcadia” trilogy from Guillermo del Toro, “She-Ra and the Princesses of Power”, “Spirit Riding Free”, and “The Boss Baby: Back in Business”.

Following NBC Universal’s acquisition of the studio, DreamWorks Animation and Netflix expanded their relationship to include first looks at animated series based on Universal Pictures properties as well as original and acquired IP. DreamWorks Animation has a number of series slated to debut on Netflix this year including “Archibald’s Next Big Thing” from executive producer Tony Hale and the highly anticipated “Fast & Furious” animated series.

HBO has a treat to ‘Share’

Published June 13, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370820

HBO has a treat to ‘Share’

movie & TV June 10, 2019 15:49

By The Nation

2,179 Viewed

 HBO is airing the movie “Share”, fresh from Cannes Film Festival’s “Special Screening: First Film” section, on July 28 at 9am and 9pm, the same times it’s being seen in the United States.

Based on Pippa Bianco’s Cannes-winning short of the same title, the feature stars Rhianne Barreto as 16-year-old Mandy, who discovers a disturbing video from a night she doesn’t remember.

She struggles to figure out what happened and how to navigate the escalating fallout.

“Share” also stars Charlie Plummer, Poorna Jagannathan, JC MacKenzie, Nicholas Galitzine, Lovie Simone and Danny Mastrogiorgio.

Bianco received the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award and Rhianne Barreto a Special Jury Award at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

The picture also closed the New Directors/New Films Festival in New York City.

Cannes comes to Hong Kong

Published June 7, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370571

Cannes comes to Hong Kong

movie & TV June 07, 2019 01:00

By THE NATION

The Festival de Cannes Film Week will land in Hong Kong later this year and make its Asia debut at the retail destination K11 Musea on the Victoria Dockside from November 12 to 17.

The event will present six films from the selection of the Festival de Cannes 2019 and invite a few select industry professionals to introduce their work and practices through a series of Q&As and masterclasses.

“The Festival de Cannes Film Week began in Buenos Aires almost 10 years ago with the idea of taking the spirit of the Festival on a global journey, thereby continuing the dialogue with people from all over the world who visit us in Cannes every year in May and creating a cinema moment with a unique format. At the Festival de Cannes we invite the whole world to come to Cannes to celebrate the art of filmmaking, to discover the latest works of great contemporary directors and to get a taste for what is up and coming in the world of cinema. With our Festival de Cannes Film Week, we hope to initiate the very opposite by taking to the road and bringing the spirit of the Festival and the work of artists to other parts of the globe,” said Pierre Lescure, president of the Festival.

Adrian Cheng, founder of K11 Group and executive vice-chairman of New World Development, believes in the power of creativity, culture and innovation to enrich daily life across businesses and local communities.

“For decades, Festival de Cannes has been synonymous with culture and creativity, and through them, it has grown to become the landmark festival that brings together the very best creative powers of cinematography. It is through our aligned vision to bring world-class curated content to a global audience that Festival de Cannes Film Week at K11 Musea is made possible. This is an important milestone for K11 Musea as we look to develop an ongoing programme of innovative cultural events for our international audience.”

Ticket details will be released later in the year. Keep updated at http://www.Festivalcannes.com.

Singapore initiative ‘Travelling Waves’ continues with screenings in Jakarta

Published June 7, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370566

Singapore initiative ‘Travelling Waves’ continues with screenings in Jakarta

movie & TV June 05, 2019 01:00

By THE NATION

2,334 Viewed

Now three decades old, the Singapore International Film Festival (SGIFF), is bringing noteworthy films with distinct voices closer to audiences in Singapore and Southeast Asia, with the launch of its inaugural edition of Travelling Waves and an all-new format of New Waves.

Travelling Waves is a multicity programme that brings Southeast Asian cinematic voices to independent screening venues around the region. The inaugural edition will present five short films by emerging regional filmmakers in Bangkok, Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur and discussions with filmmakers will also be organised to exchange ideas and perspectives.

“Even though SGIFF is based in Singapore, we want to better connect with our neighbouring film communities through this regional programme and the initiatives of the SGIFF Film Academy. Partnering with independent film spaces such as the Bangkok Screening Room, Kinosaurus and TDSC allows us to work closely with film organisations that champion the independent spirit we see in short films. Through these programmes, we see the strength of the region coming together to further develop and nurture the potential of storytelling in Southeast Asia,” said executive director Yuni Hadi.

The first session at Bangkok Screening Room on April 20 received a fullhouse reception. A testament of the curiosity towards Southeast Asian films, the audience participated actively in the post-screening dialogue with filmmakers Pathompon Mont Tesprateep (“Song X”) and Danech San (“A Million Years”). The session was moderated by Thai film critic Kong Rithdee, who will also return to SGIFF as head mentor of the Youth Jury and Critics Programme this year. Travelling Waves will be hosted next at Jakarta on June 15 and Kuala Lumpur on July 20 where attendees can also look forward to engaging screenings and discussions with filmmakers. Interested parties can visit https://sgiff.com/travellingwaves/ for ticketing details.

Returning for its fourth edition, this year’s New Waves will take place over an intimate weekend on July 12 and 13, comprising screenings and a panel discussion to develop the film audience in Singapore. The allnew format is tailored to gather more filmmakers at the same time to share diverse viewpoints and vibrant discussions with film aficionados and beginners alike.

Part of the SGIFF Film Academy, this year’s New Waves will see retrospectives of short films produced by Akanga Film Asia and led by Fran Borgia, who produced Boo Junfeng’s “Apprentice” (2016) and Yeo Siew Hua’s “A Land Imagined” (2018). It will also chart the rise and development of award-winning filmmaker Anthony Chen, in anticipation of his sophomore effort “Wet Season” (2019), after the award-winning feature “Ilo Ilo” (2013). Both Borgia and Chen will participate in the post-screening discussions. There will also be a curated lineup of films from the female perspective in “Through Her Eyes”; while Southeast Asian stories and regional cultural histories will be discussed with local filmmakers such as Nicole Midori Woodford and M Raihan Halim, moderated by writer Alfian Sa’at.

The 30th SGIFF will run from November 21 to December 1. Its call for entries for Feature and Short Films, Southeast Asian Film Lab, and Youth Jury & Critics Programme is now open and will continue till August 19.

Learn more at http://www.Sgiff.com.

DRAMA in a LAND far, far away

Published June 7, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370572

DRAMA in a LAND far, far away

movie & TV June 05, 2019 01:00

By PARINYAPORN PAJEE
THE NATION

2,111 Viewed

WHILE NEW NETFLIX SERIES ‘ARTHDAL CHRONICLES’ IS SET ON A MYTHICAL CONTINENT, THERE IS NOTHING FICTITIOUS ABOUT MAN’S STRUGGLE FOR POWER

SET IN A mythical pre-historic land, the new South Korean series “Arthdal Chronicles”, now showing on Netflix, has success written all over it. It comes courtesy of the pens of renowned screenwriters Kim Young-hyun and Park Sang-yeon whose work on the “Dae Jang Guem” series, among others, had Thais glued to the screens.

Directed by Kim Won-seok, the new series also features an all-star cast including Jae Dong-gun, Song Joong-ki, Kim Ji-won and Kim Ok-vin.

                             Soong Jung-Ki

The story takes place in a mythical land called Arth and see the inhabitants of the ancient city of Arthdal and its surrounding regions, which includes Lark (pronounced ie-ark), vie for power as they build a new society. The Arthdal Tribal Alliance is headed by the Saenyeok Tribe led by Sanung (Kim Eui-sung). Sanung’s son Tagon (Jang Dong-gun) is the leader of the allied force and leads the army to fight against the Neanthal – a tribe with extraordinary physical power. The Neanthal clan is viewed as a monster while the Arthdal Alliance is more sophisticated and civilised, practising agriculture and open to adopting new ideas. But as the Arthdal alliance develops, its need for natural resources and power increases and the fighters raid other tribal lands to expand their power base and increase their productivity.

                                      Kim Jee-won

Eunseom (Song Jung-ki) is an Igutu (a mix of Saram and Neanthal) whose mother took him from Arthdal land on the Great Black Cliff to live in Lark with the Wahan Tribe, which Tanya (Kim Jee-won) will eventually lead. For now though, he is considered as an outsider.

But with all their sophistication, the people of the Arthdal alliance are unable to dream and consider those who can, like the Neanthal and Igutu, as evil. Tagon leads his army to raid the Wahan and other tribes in Lark area but while Eunseon may appear innocent, his protective instincts are quite strong that he does not hesitate to be aggressive when attacks are imminent. And of course love comes into play through Tanya and Taealha, the latter the most beautiful lady in Arthdal and with the strongest desire for power.

Director Kim Won-seok took time out from post-production last week to attend a press conference at the Imperial Palace Seoul, saying: “We do not expect compliments just because we worked hard, but the cast and crew believe Korea should have a drama like this. Please evaluate it after watching at least the first two episodes.”

                           Director Kim Won-seok

“In the historical dramas I have done in the past, the audience could predict what would happen because they knew the king and the era we were talking about. This series is mythical and therefore unpredictable so please just watch the first two episodes. I am sure that by the end of episode 2 you will learn more about the universe of ‘Arthdal Chronicles’,” added Park Sang-yeon, one of the two screenwriters.

Initially titled “Asadal Chronicles” – Asadal being the capital of Gojoseon, the ancient kingdom on the Korean Peninsula founded by Dungun – the writers decided to set their story on an imaginary continent called Arth because they wanted to create an association between the name and the earth. Their research revealed that the Korean world “Dal” originally meant the earth, a field, or plains.

The idea for the series was conceived in 2012 after the huge success of “Deep Rooted Tree”, also written by Kim Young Hyun and Park Sang Yeon, which chronicled King Sejong and his invention of the Korean alphabet –Hanguel.

“In 2012, I wrote a proposal about this project to the network. They were surprised by the content and tried to stop me from taking it further,” Kim Young-hyon explains.

She and Park Sang Yeon later joined up with Kim Won-suk and “Arthdal” was officially born.

“We wondered, ‘did humans always dream?’ We built this world around the notion that perhaps humans haven’t always had the ability to dream and they discovered it somewhere along the way in history,” Kim says

“We found it interesting how only homo sapiens survived while the Neanderthal didn’t. We thought about why that was and decided to incorporate conversations about diversity and its acceptance in this drama,” she adds.

“Arthdal Chronicles” is Song Joong Ki’s first drama in three years since the major 2016 hit “Descendants of the Sun”.

“It’d be a lie if I said I felt no pressure. My thanks are due to my senior co-star Jang Dong-gun who helped reduce that pressure. He and I were close before we filmed the drama. We saw each other nearly every day for four months while working out. [His] reliability gently seeped in. I felt secure just by his presence on set.”

Song adds that although the story is set in the past, he didn’t approach it as he would an historical drama and change his voice and way of speaking. Instead he mostly adopts the same acting style including the gestures he would use in a modern series.

Actor Jang admits that when he first heard about the project, the only aspect with which he was familiar was the name “Asadal”.

“When we started working, it was difficult as unlike historical dramas where we have references to work with, here there’s nothing.

“We’ve never experienced this era and of course it’s imaginary anyway so it requires a lot of hard work. However the two writers created a very detailed screenplay, even providing us with a map of the region so that we are able to understand our location and how we should act,” added Jang, who gained 8 kg to bulk up for the role.

“The director and the writers are recognised for their work and the fact they are working on a new idea made me to look at myself. I guess it was a risk that people would criticise me for my acting skills but the project was definitely worth it,” Song says.

The fights between the tribes along with the production design and costumes are bound to draw parallels among viewers with HBO’s epic “Game of Thrones” and “The Lord of the Rings” but writer Park insists that “Arthdal” shouldn’t be compared to those great stories.

“’Arthdal’ is set in a pre-historic era. We are doing something different and we have done our best to create our own thing so hopefully audiences will see the series from a different perspective.”

Several recent Korean dramas have brought such new ideas into their stories as parallel worlds, zombies and AR technology. Actor Jang puts this down to Koreans being keen to embrace new things but warns that they get bored quickly too. “So I guess creators need to keep searching for new things and with Arthdal, we have that.”

“Korean films and dramas are loved because of their diverse contents. I am truly proud that our show is set in a very new and refreshing kind of a setting and I firmly believe that this is the strength of this series,” he says.

And while the writers originally planned three seasons of the “Arthdal Chronicles”, Kim says that for now she is focusing on Season 1. “If it’s successful then we can start discussions on future seasons,” she says, adding, “but nothing is confirmed for now.”

Godzilla: friend or foe?

Published June 4, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/movie/30370473

  • Actor Toni Rakkaen, centre, and movie guru Eakarach “Beer” Monwat, right, talk about “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters”.

Godzilla: friend or foe?

movie & TV June 03, 2019 14:00

By Kitchana Lersakvanitchakul
THE NATION

SF World Cinema at CentralWorld celebrated the international release of “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters” – the 35th film in the Godzilla franchise, the third film in Legendary’s MonsterVerse, and the third Godzilla film to be completely produced by a Hollywood studio by holding an event and exhibition of Godzilla figures.

“Godzilla is depicted as an enormous, prehistoric creature which has survived extinction but been awakened and empowered by nuclear radiation. In 1954’s ‘Gojira’, the director wanted Godzilla to represent the nuclear bomb and the violence in the aftermath of nuclear warfare. So, Godzilla can connect to humans easier than other monsters. It is like us looking at our mistakes,” said movie guru and columnist Eakarach “Beer” Monwat.

But is Godzilla a good or bad monster and does he protect or destroy the world?

“Actually, Godzilla is a living creature above our understanding. Since the debut movie in 1954, we have never known why Godzilla comes ashore. Later, the producer Toho created Godzilla to be like a hero for children. For me, I guess that Godzilla seems to protect its territory like a dog. I think that it should be an anti-hero,” said Beer.

What is “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters” about?

“I think that the producer wanted to interpret Godzilla to be like a man, like the last samurai, who keeps the balance or the rules. Godzilla will appear when a monster comes,” said Beer.

“I compare Godzilla to be like a sumo, Japanese wrestler. In my memory, I have always thought that Godzilla is a hero. But, in 1998, Godzilla was interpreted to be like a lizard, or iguana that had been affected from radioactivity,” said Theerachai Wimolchaireuk, aka Toni Rakkaen.

“The movie wasn’t successful because Godzilla was too thin and died after being shot. But, Toho has a rule that Godzilla mustn’t be dead. So he can return to life,” said Beer.

This second sequel also includes three monsters: Rodan, a “massive A-bomb” that brings “speed and ferocity”, Mothra, a moth with long legs in order to defend herself against other monsters, and King Ghidorah, a giant three-headed dragon with a massive wingspan and Godzilla’s arch-enemy.

“King Ghidorah’s three heads can move like a snake and wolf,” said the guru.

For more information and ticket reservations, call SF Smart Call: 1349 or visit http://www.SFCinemaCity.com.

Godzilla: friend or foe?

Published June 4, 2019 by SoClaimon

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Actor Toni Rakkaen, centre, and movie guru Eakarach “Beer” Monwat, right, talk about “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters”.
Actor Toni Rakkaen, centre, and movie guru Eakarach “Beer” Monwat, right, talk about “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters”.

Godzilla: friend or foe?

movie & TV June 03, 2019 01:00

By Kitchana Lersakvanitchakul
THE NATION

SF World Cinema at CentralWorld celebrated the international release of “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters” – the 35th film in the Godzilla franchise, the third film in Legendary’s MonsterVerse, and the third Godzilla film to be completely produced by a Hollywood studio by holding an event and exhibition of Godzilla figures.

“Godzilla is depicted as an enormous, prehistoric creature which has survived extinction but been awakened and empowered by nuclear radiation. In 1954’s ‘Gojira’, the director wanted Godzilla to represent the nuclear bomb and the violence in the aftermath of nuclear warfare. So, Godzilla can connect to humans easier than other monsters. It is like us looking at our mistakes,” said movie guru and columnist Eakarach “Beer” Monwat.

But is Godzilla a good or bad monster and does he protect or destroy the world?

“Actually, Godzilla is a living creature above our understanding. Since the debut movie in 1954, we have never known why Godzilla comes ashore. Later, the producer Toho created Godzilla to be like a hero for children. For me, I guess that Godzilla seems to protect its territory like a dog. I think that it should be an anti-hero,” said Beer.

What is “Godzilla II: King of the Monsters” about?

“I think that the producer wanted to interpret Godzilla to be like a man, like the last samurai, who keeps the balance or the rules. Godzilla will appear when a monster comes,” said Beer.

 

“I compare Godzilla to be like a sumo, Japanese wrestler. In my memory, I have always thought that Godzilla is a hero. But, in 1998, Godzilla was interpreted to be like a lizard, or iguana that had been affected from radioactivity,” said Theerachai Wimolchaireuk, aka Toni Rakkaen.

“The movie wasn’t successful because Godzilla was too thin and died after being shot. But, Toho has a rule that Godzilla mustn’t be dead. So he can return to life,” said Beer.

 

This second sequel also includes three monsters: Rodan, a “massive Abomb” that brings “speed and ferocity”, Mothra, a moth with long legs in order to defend herself against other monsters, and King Ghidorah, a giant three-headed dragon with a massive wingspan and Godzilla’s archenemy.

“King Ghidorah’s three heads can move like a snake and wolf,” said the guru.

For more information and ticket reservations, call SF Smart Call: 1349 or visit http://www.SFCinemaCity.com.

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