culture

All posts tagged culture

Plastic not fantastic

Published August 20, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374970

Plastic not fantastic

Aug 19. 2019
“Jurassic Plastic,” as a part of the exhibition “Takamatsu Contemporary Art Annual vol. 07,” (2018) Takamatsu Art Museum.

“Jurassic Plastic,” as a part of the exhibition “Takamatsu Contemporary Art Annual vol. 07,” (2018) Takamatsu Art Museum.
By The Nation

261 Viewed

Japanese artist, Hiroshi Fuji shines the spotlight on plastic in a new exhibition titled “Jurassic Plastic” opening today at ChangChui Creative Park. Brought to Thailand by the Japan Foundation, Bangkok and running through October 14, “Jurassic Plastic” was originally devised by ArtsPeople and Fuji for the 2018 edition of the Sydney Festival.

ChangChui Creative Park, which was named by Time magazine as one of the World’s Greatest Places 2018, was founded by renowned Thai designer Somchai Songwattana and created from discarded materials on the concept of “Nothing is Useless”. Under his guidance, an abandoned area has metamorphosed into a large-scale creative hub in the Thon Buri area.

Born in the same generation as Somchai, Fuji has long been angry at the way products made of plastic have mushroomed in our daily lives since the 1970s. In 1997, he started to keep and collect discarded plastic products and toys at home, resulting in the creation of his long-running project “Kaekko Bazar,” a platform where kids can exchange their unwanted toys with the other second-hand toys.

Through the project, Fuji has learned that while attractive second-hand toys are always immediately taken by kids, broken plastic toys and bonus toys distributed by fast-food chains are left and un-exchanged. Fuji has now collected more than 50,000 of these unwanted toys, mostly made of plastic, and says that it is just the tip of the iceberg. Fuji stresses that over-produced and consumed plastic products are thrown away in terrifying large quantities. They flow into rivers by floods and spread widely in the ocean, which causes a great negative impact on marine life.

In “Jurassic Plastic,” Fuji will create a dazzling large-scale installation and sculptures of dinosaurs and animals using unwanted plastic toys collected from both Japan and Thailand.

A series of workshops for both kids and grown-ups will be conducted throughout the exhibition. The organisers also welcome donations of unwanted toys, which will be used for the exhibition. Supporters can either bring them or send them by mail to ChangChui Creative Park, 460/8 Sirhindhon Road, Bang Phlat, Bangkok 10700.

Admission to the exhibition is free. Find out more at Facebook.com/ChangChuiBKK/

Advertisements

SACCICT highlights Thai craftsmanship through digital archive

Published August 16, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374858

SACCICT highlights Thai craftsmanship through digital archive

Aug 16. 2019
By The Nation

103 Viewed

The Suppport Arts and Crafts International Center of Thailand (SACICT) is promoting Thailand as the Southeast Asian hub of knowledge in arts and crafts through the Arts & Crafts Knowledge Centre, which incorporates a digital search system dubbed the SACICT Archive.

Amphawan Pichalai, director of the SACICT, recently underlined SACICT’s commitment to conserving, continuing and building on Thai arts and crafts as well collecting knowledge, wisdom and adding to the value of Thai craftsmanship by modernizing it so it is more contemporary and suitable for everyday life.

“The SACICT Arts and Crafts Knowledge Centre is provides the full range of knowledge in arts and crafts through experiences from SACICT’s exhibition halls, library and shops, as well as through modern technology platforms using a digital arts and crafts search system. The Centre is the best source of knowledge about handicrafts in Thailand and in the region and allows Thais from every sector to participate in and access information. The one-stop service includes an Exhibition Venue with six exhibition halls, namely the Arts and Crafts Hall, the Hall of Fame, the Suphanpat Hall, the International Handicraft Hall, the Nawatsilp Hall and the Khon Hall. The story of how Royal activities to promote arts and crafts in Thailand started is told and visitors are given a chance to experience precious products selected by SACICT,” she explains.

“The SACICT Shop will showcase creative and inspirational handicraft products and artworks; the SACICT Library provides information on Thai arts and crafts through books, journals, publications and video media, while the SACICT Archive offers a comprehensive digital search from a database of crafts and artworks created by master artisans of Thailand, masters of craftsmanship, handicraft heirs and designers. Such information is valuable for education, research and historical reference. There are books and video media on arts and crafts that SACICT has prepared for communities and the general public to use for research from anywhere in the world.

“Currently, SACICT has more than 600 media and provides information and knowledge on 5 categories, namely Thai master artisans and heirs, Thai handicrafts, arts and crafts villages, local museums and publications/videos.”

The SACICT Archive is a system and database based on the national strategy which requires integration of in-depth information and Big Data. Data analytics can be effectively applied to satisfy the needs of each sector, starting from students who will appreciate the value of Thai arts and crafts and find them beneficial to their study and research, leading to the continuation and sustainability of Thai craftsmanship as well as turning the knowledge into new art and craft products.

Meanwhile art and craft producers, both the villagers and the communities, will be able to apply the knowledge for self-development and to their products, which will help create opportunities and networks, generate income and reduce inequality.

Consumers and the general public too will have better access to the arts and crafts that meet their needs in everyday life, thus supporting handicraft products and strengthening income distribution.

Government agencies can utilise the Big Data for the country development and give support and assistance to the public sector, while investors and entrepreneurs looking for business opportunities in arts and crafts can use the information to their advantage in competing in Thai handicraft markets both domestically and internationally.

To access the archive, visit SACICT.or.th and click the SACICT Archive icon,

The SACICT Arts & Crafts Knowledge Centre is located within the SUPPORT Arts and Crafts International Center of Thailand in Bang Sai District, Phra Nakhon Si Ayutthaya. It’s open daily from 8am to 5pm and admission is free. For more information, call 1289.

Japanese artist toys with notion of gravity

Published August 15, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374821

Japanese artist toys with notion of gravity

Aug 15. 2019
By The Nation

128 Viewed

Japanese artist Takanobu Kobayashi explores the notion of balance and gravity in his exhibition “Balance”, which runs from August 15 to November 3 at 100 Tonson Gallery.

Inspired by his residency programme at the gallery – when he opened his studio so visitors could observe the process of him creating his works and share ideas – Kobayashi uses the word “balance” to suggest a disruption of reality around him.

In an effort to depict the quiet multitude of forest, the artist places toy blocks on a grass plane to create a kind of visual equilibrium, which at a distance appear normal but on closer inspection seem to be fighting against gravity. The artist says his aim is to point out the obvious fictional realm within a canvas, while maintaining the realistic attributes of an object

The 59-year-old is considered one of the most influential contemporary Japanese painters, and his work has been included in many major surveys and exhibitions around the world. Kobayashi is known for his serene, luminous landscapes, with his sunlight-flooded canvases invoking spiritual experiences as well as reflecting commentary of his surroundings.

The exhibition is supported by the Japan Foundation on Bangkok. 100 Tonson Gallery is open from 11am to 7pm from Thursday to Sunday.

Contact info@100tonsongallery.com or call (02) 510 5813 for more information.

When the old meets the new

Published August 14, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374726

When the old meets the new

Aug 14. 2019
By Special to The Nation

92 Viewed

Li Yugang’s celebrated song and dance production “Lady Zhaojun” is all set to take audiences on a journey deep into Chinese culture in October 5 and 6 as part of the upcoming Bangkok’s 21st International Festival of Dance and Music.

The award winning Li Yugang offers a contemporary interpretation of this classic story through a performance featuring 70 dancers, singers and actors. The show premiered in Beijing in April, and is being staged outside China for the first time in Bangkok. Featuring elaborate sets and stunning costumes, it connects the enigmatic orient of the past and its traditions to the 21st century, drawing deeply on the traditions of Chinese opera, folk music and drama while energising it with newer innovations.

This poetic song-dance drama benefits from the talent of renowned masters like Oscar award winner for Best Arts Design Award and Best Arts Director Ye Jintian; Taiwan’s “Dark genius” and nationally-honoured recipient of the “Five Best” Project Award drama director Li Xiaoping; Liu Xingli who is vice president of the China’s Academy of the Performing Arts and professor at the Central Academy of Drama; and young composer Zhang Xiaozhen.

The production traces the path of Lady or Wang Zhaojun as she devotes herself to ensuring lasting peace between the Han dynasty and Xiongnu empire: Wang Zhaojun is forced to depart for the grasslands at the northern border in a diplomatic marriage between the Han state and the Xiongnus (Huns). The narrative follows Zhaojun’s courageous pursuit of self and peace between nations.

The creative team uses dramatic techniques to interweave chronological narrative with flashbacks, focusing on a surprising plot and characterisations to present a multifaceted, moving story of Wang Zhaojun from the moment she enters the Han Imperial Palace as a concubine to the Emperor, to when she becomes the legendary “Mother of the Grassland”.

In the hands of Li Yugang, this story turns into a masterpiece. Li Yugang has performed several times in Australia, Austria, Canada, Republic of Korea, United States and Canada. His other critically-acclaimed stage productions include “Flower in the Mirror, Moon in the Water and Portrait of Four Ancient Beauties”. He is also famous for his musical concerts and has staged several in China including: “Where Flower are Unboundeds, Forever Young”, “Nichang in the Tang Dynasty, Li Yugang and His Friends”, and “Classical Performances for the Past Decade”. The last concert was also staged in New York, Los Angeles and Vancouver. Among his other credits are 14 music albums and several literary works.

This production, a commissioned work for the 19th Beijing Arts Festival, is a pioneering attempt at analysing, interpreting, and presenting the historical Wang Zhaojun and her journey. Li Yugang immerses himself in the mountains and rivers along her path, in the regional local traditions and customs as he retells the long journey to the frontier.

Tickets costing from Bt1,500 to Bt4,500 are on sale at Thai Ticket Major counters, online at www.ThaiTicketMajor.comand by calling (02) 262 3191. Find out more at www.BangkokFestivals.com.

Supporting the Festival are Bangkok Bank (PCL), Bangkok Marriott Marquis Queen’s Park, BMW Thailand, B.Grimm Group, Indorama Ventures, Major Cineplex Group, Nation Group,

PTT (PCL), PTT Global Chemical PCL, Singha Corporation, Thai Union Group, Thai Airways International, Tourism Authority of Thailand and Ministry of Culture

Flights of aesthetic fancy

Published August 14, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374723

Flights of aesthetic fancy

Aug 14. 2019
By The Nation

94 Viewed

A combination of acrobatics, theatre, dance and music, “La Verita” by Compagnia Finzi Pasca from Switzerland is a dramatic and surrealistic performance that is guaranteed to wow audiences at Bangkok’s 21st International Festival of Dance and Music.

Being staged on September 21 and 22 at the Thailand Cultural Centre, “La Verita” is an electrifying extravaganza of lighting, amazing costumes and breath-taking acrobatics performed by a troupe of multi- talented singers, dancers and, of course, acrobats.

Founded by Antonio Vergamini, Daniele Finzi Pasca, Hugo Gargiulo, Julie Hamelin Finzi and Maria Bonzanigo, the troupe continues the work of the Teatro Sunil and Inlevitas. The distinctive approach of the Compagnia Finzi Pasca took shape from the concepts of the “Theatre of the Caress” and the “Invisible Gesture”. Developed over the course of 35 years, these concepts have been consolidated into a very personal style of creativity and production, as well as a philosophy of training for the actor, acrobat, musician, dancer and technician – turning them into a unique way of inhabiting the space.

Based in Lugano, Switzerland, the company has created three Olympic Ceremonies (Turin 2006 and Sochi 2014, both Olympic and Paralympic Games), two shows for the Cirque du Soleil: Luzia in 2016 and Corteo in 2005, five operas of which “Aida” and Verdi’s “Requiem” are officially part of the Mariinsky Theatre at St Petersburg yearly programme, as well as the operas “Carmen” and “Pagliacci” at the Teatro San Carlo in Naples and “Love from Afar” for the English National Opera, London. It has also created “Avudo”, a multimedia show that combines video mapping, lights and water fountains for the city of Montreal and is in the process of creating the next “Fete des Vignerons” (“Winegrowers Festival”), an event that takes place every 25 years in Vevey, Switzerland.

La Verita draws on surrealism and the director Daniele Finzi Pasca uses the analogy of horses to describe the cast and their work, “I have been working for a while with these very special performers. They are all horses. There is a strange magnetism to them, a delicate strength that comes from their lightness. You keep asking whether they are actors, acrobats, clowns or musicians… The answer is, they are horses.”

He turns to food however to expand on what La Verita means, “Sometimes, we feel like finding the familiar flavours, smells and spices. For this production, the team is preparing Dalí’s surrealist tapas,” alluding to Salvador Dali’s backdrop for a play in 1940s that inspired this performance.

“The language of acrobatics, of physical theatre may easily conquer a territory where it is neither night nor day, where light doesn’t touch reality but designs it, invents it or reinvents it. The language of the acrobats titillates our unconscious, making us see inner landscapes that appear truer than reality. Dali’s landscapes are set during night or day? The answer: neither, Dali’s images belong to another dimension, the dimension of dreams, he adds”

Tickets costing from Bt1,200 to Bt3,000 are on sales at Thai Ticket Major counters and online. Call (02) 262 3191. For more information, visit www.bangkokfestivals.com.

Supporting the Festival are Bangkok Bank (PCL), Bangkok Marriott Marquis Queen’s Park, BMW Thailand, B.Grimm Group, Indorama Ventures, Major Cineplex Group, Nation Group, PTT (PCL), PTT Global Chemical PCL, Singha Corporation, Thai Union Group, Thai Airways International, Tourism Authority of Thailand and Ministry of Culture

With upcycling, Silpathorn awardee Singh has found a way

Published August 12, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374608

With upcycling, Silpathorn awardee Singh has found a way

Aug 11. 2019
Associate Professor Dr Singh Intrachooto, winner of the Silpathorn 2019 Award in design, at his exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre that open now till August 31, 2019.

Associate Professor Dr Singh Intrachooto, winner of the Silpathorn 2019 Award in design, at his exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre that open now till August 31, 2019.
By Somluck Srimalee
The Nation

747 Viewed

“I was talking about environmental issues 14 years ago when I came back to work in Thailand and saw all the material wasted in my architectural construction. I had to ask myself, ‘What could I do?’”

Associate Professor Dr Singh Intrachooto, winner of the Silpathorn 2019 Award in design, recalled his dismay at the opening talk of his exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.

Singh is among seven artists named as this year’s Silpathorn awardees by the Culture Ministry in different categories.

 

Associate Professor Dr Singh Intrachooto presents about  exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.on Saturday.

Associate Professor Dr Singh Intrachooto presents about exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.on Saturday.

The others are Natee Utarit in the visual arts, Assistant Professor Boonserm Premthada in architecture, Worapoj Panpong in literature, Anan Nakkong in music, Damkeng Thitapiyasak in performing arts and Sayombhu Mukdeeprom in movies and motion media.

Singh's exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.

Singh’s exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.

Singh said he first became interested in “upcycling” waste to give it new value a few years after he graduated in design technology and architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and returned to Thailand.

“We saw over 30 percent of construction waste sent to landfills.  At construction sites, a lot of it got buried at the property, polluting the ground. It inspired me to look for ways to make construction waste reusable.”

His success since then has seen waste from construction sites, manufacturing and households – everything from junk plastic to egg shells – turned into furniture, construction materials and much more.

“Now I’m being honoured for this, but it wasn’t smooth sailing,” he said. “I had to sail through a lot of wind and waves.”

Not even his family or friends understood so they could not really be very supportive, some thought he was wasting his time and talents on upcycling. He considered giving up, but decided to conduct some tests first, and if they failed, he’d abandon the effort.

“If I didn’t at least try, it would still be bothering me. I experimented with upcycling agricultural waste first, turning it into raw construction materials such as fibreboard and artificial stone.”

But a lot of end-users, such as construction firms and property firms, weren’t interested in using these materials. “I’d failed to properly promote the idea of upcycling.”

Then Singh found a way to blend science and creative design. The result was a line of furniture sold under the Osisu brand, a success in both domestic sales and exports when it was unveiled in 2006.

It also earned Singh a green light to research and develop more products from waste at his “Scrap Lab” at Kasetsart University, where he’s in charge of the Creative Centre for Eco-design.

Singh's Exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.

Singh’s Exhibition “Upcycling Design Journey Targeting Sustainability” at Bangkok’s Ratchadamnoen Contemporary Art Centre.

He next had to secure more funding to support green innovation center on Kasetsart University Campus to benefit the environment and industry, including waste management and design.

Most of the people and agencies he approached, though, “don’t believe it’s necessary nor possible”, and again it was a rough time.

Funding came in 2016 from Magnolia Quality Development Corp (MQDC) to set up the Research & Innovation for Sustainability Centre (RISC) to serve the public.

“It’s taken time, but I was determined and learning all the time, and I believed in my sustainability commitments,” Singh said. “I believed it would eventually be welcome.”

 

He told The Nation separately that his winning the Silpathorn Award ought to inspire designers to seek ways to use “waste” that are not actually waste or scraps in their projects.

“I hope the idea of reducing waste under the concept of ‘upcycle, recycle, reuse’ will gain more acceptance as part of the circular economy. I expect the concept to be applied in every industry, such as fashion, product design, manufacturing, medical and more.

“We are all citizens of the world and our responsibility is to help make life sustainable for future generations, not just our own.”

A heady brew of art

Published August 11, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374587

A heady brew of art

Aug 10. 2019
Nation photo Wanchai Kraisornkhajit.

Nation photo Wanchai Kraisornkhajit.
267 Viewed

MRT Wat Mangkon station, a newly opened transportation gateway in the heart of Yaowarat, Thailand’s biggest Chinatown, is celebrating art in a unique fashion. Nescafe Blend & Brew has opened the country’s first Interactive Art Station at the station, featuring a collection of large-scale artworks by passionate Thai artist Phannapast Taychamaythakool.

A series of colourful illustrations of Nescafe red mug interactive art in a contemporary Chinese style and trick art augmented by advanced AR technology are installed throughout the station under the concept “The Land of Irresistible Aroma”. The works by Phannapast, who has also worked with leading global fashion brand Gucci, are being portrayed as a perfect bond where coffee meets contemporary Chinese art.

 

Nescafe believes the interactive art station will delight the millions of MRT riders who pass through the station.

Naritta Vipulyasekha, business manager – Nescafe Coffee Mixes, Nestle (Thai), said, “Nescafe Blend & Brew, Yaowarat, and Wat Mangkon all have a common value of nurturing stronger bonds among Thai people. This is why we invited talented Thai artist Phannapast to create gorgeous interactive works of art drawn in her unique style everywhere in the station under the theme ‘Land of Irresistible Aroma’. The story begins with many kinds of creatures bringing the two types of Nescafe Blend & Brew coffee beans together, which are then roasted by a fire-breathing dragon to deliver the irresistible aroma and great taste of coffee for everybody to enjoy together.”

She said they have bonded the coffee culture story with contemporary Chinese art, enhanced with advanced AR technology, to reinforce Nescafe’s position as the number one favourite coffee mix of Thai people. “We anticipate that the Nescafe Interactive Art Station will have more than 12 million visitors over the coming year, or about 30,000 people a day.”

Visitors can see all the AR moving images by downloading an application Recall on their smartphone, which is used for seeing the AR.

Artist Phannapast said, “MRT Wat Mangkon is located in Yaowarat, the heart of Thai Chinese commercial community, which I am very familiar with and share a strong bond with, as my family often visit Wat Mangkon. My illustrations tell a great story about how Nescafe and Wat Mangkon connect people together. The Sapha Kafe is a centre for coffee that creates love, friendship, and bonding. If you look closely at every dragon in the illustrations, they are smiling as if they were saying, ‘Start your day with a smile, start your day with coffee’. So don’t forget to take a selfie with the dragons.”

The official launch of the interactive art station at MRT Wat Mangkon was led by Victor Seah, chairman and chief executive officer, Nestlé Indochina, along with executives from Nestle (Thai) Limited, artist Phannapast, actor Jirayu Tangsrisuk who is Nescafé Blend & Brew brand ambassador, Thanapob Leeratanakajorn ( Nescafe Americano brand ambassador), Teeradon Supapunpinyo; Chutimon (Aokbab) Chuengcharoensukying and Marie Broenner.

Victor said, “We have transformed the station into the Land of Irresistible Aroma, showcasing beautiful works of Chinese art enhanced by AR technology. This creates a truly unique and immersive experience for people visiting Yaowarat on the MRT. We believe that MRT Wat Mangkon will be a new landmark in Yaowarat, delighting visitors from Thailand and all over the world.”

Yaowarat has been the centre of the Thai-Chinese community and a prosperous commercial area for over 128 years. For the past 148 years, Wat Mangkon, the largest and most important Chinese Buddhist temple in Yaowarat, has attracted millions of visitors from around the world and is a major centre for members of the Thai-Chinese community.

Nescafe is also offering an exclusive line of merchandise specially designed by Phannapast featuring contemporary Chinese designs. This limited collection, which includes a Nescafe red mug, bag, notebook, scarf, and T-shirt, is exclusively available at MRT Wat Mangkon from September onwards.

Nattavut Trivisvavet, managing director of Bangkok Metro Networks Limited, said, “With the public’s positive reaction to the art installation even before the official launch, as well as today, I believe that MRT Wat Mangkon will help promote tourism and become a new destination that Thai people as well as visitors to the country will love.”

Devoted to Dunhuang

Published August 8, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374454

Devoted to Dunhuang

Aug 08. 2019
A painting Chang Shana copied from the Mogao grottoes in 1947.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A painting Chang Shana copied from the Mogao grottoes in 1947.[Photo provided to China Daily]
By China Daily
Asia News Network

172 Viewed

An exhibition reveals how a father and daughter’s commitment to conservation was forged by long days spent in caves unearthing a cultural oasis, Lin Qi reports.

 

Chang Shana was just 13 when her love affair with Dunhuang began. Born in France, she was the youngest member of a conservation and research team at the Mogao Caves led by her father Chang Shuhong (1904-94), a noted painter who had returned from Paris to become a founding director of the Dunhuang Academy.

Having spent six consecutive school holidays following her father’s research team into the grottoes-a cultural repository of unparalleled beauty and diversity created over the course of a millennium-Chang Shana learned, like many graduates of fine art, to replicate the dazzling murals and Buddhist statues on paper.

In 1946, Chang Shana and her father held a joint exhibition in Lanzhou, Gansu province, where their paintings and drawings of the murals caused a great stir, and helped Chang Shuhong to raise funds for further research at Dunhuang.

Over the following decades, Chang Shuhong devoted himself to the preservation of Dunhuang’s art legacy. Hailed as the “patron saint of Dunhuang”, he lived there until he was transferred to Beijing in 1982.

And Chang Shana, who was the head of the former Central Academy of Arts and Design (currently the Tsinghua University’s Academy of Arts and Design), has spent her entire life carrying on her father’s commitment to Dunhuang. After conducting extensive research into the variety of patterns found on the murals, she applied these classic motifs to her own, modern designs.

 

A painting in which Chang Shuhong depicted Jiucenglou, or the Nine-story Building.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A painting in which Chang Shuhong depicted Jiucenglou, or the Nine-story Building.[Photo provided to China Daily]

To mark the dedication of the father and daughter to Dunhuang, a second joint exhibition, Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, is running at the Tsinghua University Art Museum through Sept 15. It explores how Dunhuang’s treasure trove of history, art and culture altered the Chang family’s destiny and continues to influence Chang Shana’s work today.

The exhibition shows several oil paintings. They are copies of original works by Chang Shuhong which are now on a permanent display at the Zhejiang Provincial Museum in his hometown Hangzhou.

The paintings tell of Chang Shuhong’s time in Paris, where he attended the prestigious art school Ecole nationale superieure des Beaux-Arts. His work earned him acclaim at the Paris Salon and helped to forge his reputation as an important artist.

But all this was soon to change, after he read Paul Pelliot’s Catalog of Dunhuang Caves, and saw at the Guimet Museum a display of artworks plundered from Dunhuang by Western explorers. This not only ignited his lifelong interest in Dunhuang, but also honed his desire to protect it for posterity.

Amid wars and social chaos, Chang Shuhong and his team arrived in Dunhuang and started to clean up and bolster the ill-protected relic site. “My father never felt that he had sacrificed a promising future as an artist for his hard job at Dunhuang,” Chang Shana, now 88, says.

A painting of rocket larkspur flowers by Chang Shana in 1979.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A painting of rocket larkspur flowers by Chang Shana in 1979.[Photo provided to China Daily]

While Chang Shuhong researched and cataloged the cave art, Chang Shana set about copying the murals by day and refining her painting skills by night.

“My father was strict about my studies. He asked me to get up early and practice the calligraphy found in Buddhist texts from the Tang Dynasty (618-907),” she says.

She recalls her excitement each day when she climbed up the ladder leading into the caves with the other researchers.

“The caves had no doors and faced east. When dawn broke, the morning glow lit up the colorful murals. Those beautiful, benign Buddhist statues kept me company.”

While Chang Shana was helping her father prepare for a Dunhuang art exhibition in Beijing during the early 1950s, she met two old family friends who had a great influence on how they set out to promote Dunhuang-the architect couple Liang Sicheng and Lin Huiyin. They were impressed by the art as well as Chang Shana’s gift for painting.

“That was how I later became an assistant to Lin Huiyin, who was then a professor at Tsinghua University’s architecture department. Although she was very sick, she put all her heart into showing me how to categorize all the sophisticated patterns I saw in the caves and then transform them into designs that could benefit people’s everyday lives.”

A visitor looks at a flora-themed painting by Chang Shana in Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, an exhibition of her and her late father Chang Shuhong's artworks at the Tsinghua University Art Museum through Sept 15.[Photo provided to China Daily]

A visitor looks at a flora-themed painting by Chang Shana in Everlasting Beauty of Dunhuang, an exhibition of her and her late father Chang Shuhong’s artworks at the Tsinghua University Art Museum through Sept 15.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chang Shana went on to use the vivid and rhythmically arranged motifs from the murals and the caisson ceilings that delighted her as a teenager to decorate the interiors of grand buildings, as well as applying them to ornamental objects such as plates, scarves and clothes, as visitors to the exhibition will see.

While she worked on her designs, she often remembered her father’s words: “Shana, don’t forget you are from Dunhuang. It’s time to raise the profile of Dunhuang to a higher level.”

Chang Shuhong moved to Beijing in 1982, where he served as an adviser to the National Cultural Heritage Administration before finally retiring. Chang Shana recalls how her father often said he felt like “a visitor” in Beijing and how he missed Dunhuang and wanted to return.

It is said the famous Japanese author and Buddhist philosopher Daisaku Ikeda once asked Chang Shuhong which profession he would choose after his reincarnation. Chang replied, “I’m not a Buddhist … but if I were born into this world again, I would still be the man I am today, and I would continue my unfinished work (protecting Dunhuang).”

 

Chang Shana at the exhibition opening at the Tsinghua University Art Museum on July 15.[Photo provided to China Daily]

Chang Shana at the exhibition opening at the Tsinghua University Art Museum on July 15.[Photo provided to China Daily]

After his death, Chang Shuhong was buried in Dunhuang. His grave faces Jiucenglou (Nine-story Building), a landmark structure at the Mogao Caves. He painted the building in 1952, and this work is also on display at the Tsinghua University Art Museum.

At the end of the exhibition, there is a whiteboard mounted on the wall where visitors can leave comments. Chang Shana was the first one to write down her feelings at the exhibition’s opening.

She writes: “Dear dad, all my life I’ve been following your instructions to promote Dunhuang’s art and culture, and help integrate them into people’s lives. Today, it feels like we are meeting again!

“Please rest assured, because a lot of people in this country pay attention to and deeply love Dunhuang, and they will work together to restore it to its former glory as a jewel on the Silk Road.”

Exhibition honours Queen Sirikit’s devotion to heritage

Published August 6, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374337

Exhibition honours Queen Sirikit’s devotion to heritage

Aug 06. 2019
By The Nation100 Viewed

The enduring efforts of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit, the Queen Mother, to preserve Thai traditional silk and support Thai rice development will be highlighted in the exhibition “Thai Treasures” Thursday through Monday (August 8 to 12) at Iconsiam.

The show, co-sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Thai Rice Foundation and rice brand Tra Chat, commemorates Her Majesty’s 87th birthday on the 12th.

Queen Sirikit is renowned for her patronage and personal initiative in revitalising and promoting indigenous silk-weaving and craftsmanship traditions, which succeeded in winning the fabric global admiration and, equally important, creating sustainable income for thousands of people.

In announcing the exhibition, Culture Minister Itthiphol Kunplome noted that both the Queen Mother and her late husband, His Majesty King Bhumibol, were recognised as the country’s Supreme Artists – she for her decades-long dedication to cultural heritage.

“Her Majesty has worked tirelessly to preserve these ancient arts that represent our heritage and pride, and most importantly helped improve the overall wellbeing of her people while improving the skills of craftsmen,” he said.

“Her Majesty’s other significant endeavour was in accumulating the knowledge and resources to advance the quality of Thai rice, the country’s major cash crop and an integral part of Thai culture. Her advice on farming and strain improvement has improved everyone’s quality of life.

The ministry is encouraging citizens to wear Thai silk more often and has called on prominent Thai fashion designers to create contemporary clothing suitable for daily wear and international sale.

Ek Thongprasert

Ek Thongprasert

“Rice is a national treasure symbolising love and growth,” said Tra Chat chief operating officer Thiti Lujintanon. “Rice plantations in Thailand occupy over 50 million rai, so it’s a commodity essential to our national security, to both farmers and consumers, the dietary staple of over 65 million Thai people.

“Jasmine rice is internationally recognised thanks to its long grain, soft texture and aromatic flavour when cooked. No other rice varieties can beat Thai jasmine rice, making it the most famous rice in the world.”

The Thai Rice Foundation will have on display samples of Jasmine 105, Kor Kaw 43, Brown, Na Prung, Pathum Thani Jasmine, Khao Kam Phayao (black sticky rice), Puen Kama and Sangyod to illustrate how inseparable rice is to the Thai way of life.

Premium silk made at Baan Krua Nua in Bangkok, Khuntham Wat Somsri Baan Siew Noi in Chaiyaphum, Baan Don in Khon Kaen, Huaysai Suksawad in Lam Phun and Baan Tha Krajai in Surat Thani will be sold.

Visitors can watch a demonstration of how to store silk properly in the traditional way, hear a talk on the five much sought-after Benjapakee fabrics, see silk embroidered for Zin Bua sarongs, and enjoy celebrity chefs cooking with Chat rice.

Designer Ek Thongprasert will present a silk-fashion show on Thursday at 5pm. It will take place on a stage designed by Kenko Kuma – a Japanese architect known for integrating nature – to resemble rice terraces.

Art and Culture

Published August 6, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30374330

Art and Culture

Aug 06. 2019
By The Nation123 Viewed

Raising funds for badly needed shelter

The UN Refugee Agency UNHCR has joined forces with prominent Buddhist monk Phra Medhivajirodom in organising the “Art for Refugees Exhibition 2” to raise funds for refugee shelters as part of UNHCR’s global campaign “Nobody Left Outside”. The exhibition is now showing at the Temporary Exhibition Room on the ground floor of the Museum of Contemporary Art and will continue through the end of the month.

With more than 70 million refugees and displaced people globally, the world is witnessing the highest level of displacement in almost 70 years. When entire families are forced to flee from war, persecution and conflict, provision of a safe shelter is the first critical step to assist them to rebuild their lives.

UNHCR research shows that millions of people are suffering in desperate living conditions that leave them exposed to both physical and emotional risks. “Nobody Left Outside” calls on individuals, corporations or foundations to help raise the funds needed to shelter at least two million of the most vulnerable refugees around the world.

“We are grateful for the support of Phra Medhivajirodom and leading Thai artists to the Nobody Left Outside campaign for the second time,” said Pia Carmela Paguio, UNHCR’s Deputy Representative in Thailand. “This is a great example of the type of collective response which is needed more than ever given the current scale and complexity of the global refugee crisis.”

Donations received during the “Art for Refugees Exhibition 1” and from UNHCR partners around the world have helped UNHCR to distribute more than 70,000 tents and around 2 million pieces of plastic sheeting to support refugee families.

Thirty leading Thai artists are supporting this year’s efforts, among them Decha Warashoon, Preecha Thaothong, Sompop Budtarad, Prateep Kochabua and Thongchai Srisukprasert. All are showcasing their work at the exhibition along with two special guests, actors Tanawat “Pope” Wattanaputi and Jirayu “Got” Tantrakul, who have created artwork to be auctioned at the exhibition’s opening ceremony to raise funds for the campaign.

“In light of the global crisis, compassion becomes more important. For me, people who are forced to flee from home deserve to live with dignity and need our empathy and support without discrimination,” said Phra Medhivajirodom, who is UNHCR’s Patron for Peace and Compassion. “Every person needs a safe place to live and your support in providing one of the basic needs to the less fortunate is considered meaningful.”

%d bloggers like this: