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On the tourist trail in Iowa #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 18, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380732?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

On the tourist trail in Iowa

Jan 18. 2020
A bluff view of the Mississippi River and Lock and Dam No. 12 from Bellevue State Park in Bellevue, Iowa, in Jan. 8, 2020. In the winter, bird watchers can often see bald eagles hunting for fish by the lock and dam. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

A bluff view of the Mississippi River and Lock and Dam No. 12 from Bellevue State Park in Bellevue, Iowa, in Jan. 8, 2020. In the winter, bird watchers can often see bald eagles hunting for fish by the lock and dam. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs
By The Washington Post · Andrea Sachs · FEATURES, TRAVEL

In the first weekend of 2020, seven Democratic presidential candidates blew through Iowa like a snow squall. Elizabeth Warren appeared in Manchester, Maquoketa, Davenport and Dubuque. Bernie Sanders also stopped by Dubuque, in addition to Grundy Center, Mason City and Boone. Joe Biden logged significant miles around the Hawkeye State as well, visiting Waterloo, Davenport, Grinnell, Vinton and Des Moines.

I landed in the state capital at the same time as John Delaney’s Sunday event in Sheldon and checked into my room while Biden was speaking in Davenport. If I had unpacked a little faster, I could have caught the tail end of Tom Steyer’s talk in Newton. But after the flight, I just wanted a drink, without the politicking.

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA - JANUARY 10: Vendor booths stand inside the Newbo City Market in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on January 10, 2020. (Photo by Daniel Acker for The Washington Post)

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA – JANUARY 10: Vendor booths stand inside the Newbo City Market in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on January 10, 2020. (Photo by Daniel Acker for The Washington Post)

Over the next few weeks, all eyes will bore into Iowa, the first state in the country to hold a caucus or primary. The Democratic candidates – 12 at the time of publishing, 14 during my visit – are blanketing the Midwestern state, jockeying for supporters before the Feb. 3 caucuses. (A few Republicans challenging President Trump, such as Bill Weld and Joe Walsh, are also popping up in Iowa.) The politically minded will focus on the policies, positions and personalities of the POTUS hopefuls, but I was more interested in the datelines – the destinations and attractions that will be here long after the politicians have moved on to another state, another election. While the candidates come to Iowa for votes, I came to Iowa for Iowa.

Hamburg Inn No. 2 holds a Coffee Bean Caucus, in which one person gets one vote and everyone participates. The restaurant, where Ronald Reagan once ate, is shown Jan. 10, 2020, in Iowa City. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Daniel Acker

Hamburg Inn No. 2 holds a Coffee Bean Caucus, in which one person gets one vote and everyone participates. The restaurant, where Ronald Reagan once ate, is shown Jan. 10, 2020, in Iowa City. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Daniel Acker

For three out of every four years, Iowa is relegated to flyover status. So, you can’t blame the state of corn, Hawkeyes and Herbert Hoover for basking in the spotlight while it can.

As a resident of Washington, D.C., my ears have been rubbed raw by political talk. But in Iowa, the topic seemed refreshing and new. Like the time I spotted my college professor on a beach in Rhode Island. I found her more compelling in a different environment.

The Amana Colonies is home to Iowa's only remaining woolen mill, which has been in continuous operation since 1857. At the mill's shop, visitors can pick up textiles and other gifts. Photographed Jan. 6, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

The Amana Colonies is home to Iowa’s only remaining woolen mill, which has been in continuous operation since 1857. At the mill’s shop, visitors can pick up textiles and other gifts. Photographed Jan. 6, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

Businesses around the state are capitalizing on this moment. Sock Spot, a vendor in the NewBo City Market in Cedar Rapids, carries election-themed sport socks with candidates’ names (Mayor Pete [Buttigieg], Warren), public service announcements (“Do the right thing 2020”) and unifying slogans (“I vote for snacks”). The store’s owner, who was wearing chihuahua-print socks, said the Bernie and Trump styles with unruly hair (comb included, to tame the locks) were doing well. But if votes were based on sales, Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes would become the next POTUS.

The town of Pella, which Dutch immigrants established in the mid-1800s, celebrates its Dutch traditions including a tulip festival and the Vermeer Windmill, at nearly 125 feet the tallest working windmill in North America. It is shown Jan. 6, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

The town of Pella, which Dutch immigrants established in the mid-1800s, celebrates its Dutch traditions including a tulip festival and the Vermeer Windmill, at nearly 125 feet the tallest working windmill in North America. It is shown Jan. 6, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

Raygun, a printing, clothing and novelty retailer with several locations around the state, slaps a crooked smile on the straight face of such serious subjects as politics, social causes and Iowa stereotypes. The company, which leans left, has created islands of candidate-related merchandise within its stores. Here, you can pick up books by Warren, Sanders and Biden, among others; T-shirts (“Give Pete a chance!”); and laser-cut ornaments (Warren hanging with Lizzo and a gun-toting cat). If you have lost track of which candidates have dropped out of the race, check the discounted rack: The “Iowa for Beto” shirts are on sale.

The 1989 movie "Field of Dreams" plays continuously in the farmhouse in Dyersville, Iowa, shown Jan. 7, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs (Andrea Sachs/The Washinton Post)

The 1989 movie “Field of Dreams” plays continuously in the farmhouse in Dyersville, Iowa, shown Jan. 7, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs (Andrea Sachs/The Washinton Post)

On weekends, diners, including many Drake University students nursing hangovers, stand in line for breakfast at Waveland Cafe in Des Moines. The place is packed; the clamoring for hash browns loud. But on a Monday morning, I had many seating choices: counter or booth, by the photo montage of regulars or the wall of signatures by journalists and politicians. Two bites into my rye toast, I noticed a familiar face with a Ned Flanders mustache and a Hawaiian shirt. I dropped my slice to say hello to Waveland owner David Stone. I asked him how the cafe had become a campaign and press stop during the caucuses. He said it gained national attention in 2000, when Tom Brokaw reported live from the 54-seat diner. This year, CNN wanted to set up operations inside, but Stone declined: feeding frenzy before media frenzy.

n Dyersville, Iowa, fans of the 1989 movie "Field of Dreams" can run the bases and tour the white clapboard farmhouse occupied by the fictional Kinsella family. Photographed Jan. 7, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

n Dyersville, Iowa, fans of the 1989 movie “Field of Dreams” can run the bases and tour the white clapboard farmhouse occupied by the fictional Kinsella family. Photographed Jan. 7, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Andrea Sachs

“They can’t take over the restaurant on a weekend,” he said. “We are extremely busy, and I can’t have cameras getting in the way of my customers.”

Not even Aquaman could move the mountain of eggs and potatoes. When Jason Momoa, a native Iowan, wanted to hold a family reunion at the diner last year, Stone agreed, but only if his party arrived at 7 a.m. and cleaned their plates before the official opening hour of 8. “He complied,” Stone said of the herculean actor.

Merchandise by Raygun, a novelty retailer with several locations around Iowa, is shown in an Iowa City store on Jan. 10, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Daniel Acker

Merchandise by Raygun, a novelty retailer with several locations around Iowa, is shown in an Iowa City store on Jan. 10, 2020. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Daniel Acker

Since 2004, the Hamburg Inn No. 2 in Iowa City has held the Coffee Bean Caucus. The process is much easier than the actual Iowa caucuses. At the front counter, guests take a bean from a jar and drop it into a smaller container (a paper-clip holder?) embellished with the name of their preferred candidate. At the end of the day, the staff transfers the beans to the larger Mason jars lined up on a shelf near the front door. The policy is one person/one vote, but everyone can participate, including non-natives (often called “captives” in Iowa-speak), children and foreigners.

“This gives us a really good sense of what the consensus in Iowa City is,” said Elise Prendergast, the front house manager, adding that Bernie Sanders won in 2016.

On the Tuesday morning I stopped by, Buttigieg and Sanders were bean-to-bean, and Mike Bloomberg’s canister was empty. Elise said the numbers are always in flux, however. After the December debate, Amy Klobuchar’s bean count rose.

The restaurant is lined with press clippings, and toward the back, you can genuflect before a shrine to past candidates and ex-presidents. In 1992, three years after leaving office, Ronald Reagan visited the Hamburg Inn and sat at what is now the Presidential Table. According to the menu from his visit, he ordered meatloaf, french fries, green beans, a roll with butter and apple pie a la mode, which he ate first.

Of course, tastes and diets have changed since the Reagan years, so I asked Elise for her menu picks. She recommended the hamburgers and pie shakes, a blend of vanilla ice cream and pie – America in a glass.

At Eatery A in Des Moines, I ordered a Moscow mule and chatted with the mustachioed bartender about the restaurant’s former occupants, first a Blockbuster Video store and later Barack Obama’s caucus headquarters. I had read that a few campaign offices were nearby – Delaney’s is a few blocks away – and wondered if he had a Spidey sense about the diners’ identities. With the excitement of a wildlife enthusiast on safari, I asked him if he could point to any campaign workers.

“They wear buttons,” he answered, scanning the establishment.

We didn’t see any lapel accessories, but he did notice a man and woman of distinction in the booth behind me.

“Are you guys with the Well Pennies?” he gushed to the Des Moines-based folk-pop band. “I love your song ‘Ooh La La.’ ”

That night at the hotel, I fell asleep to the duo’s music and not the news headlines.

In Pella, a Dutch-accented town about an hour east of Des Moines, the woman in the white bonnet didn’t want to talk politics. She had more pressing matters to discuss: pastries.

Bakeries all over town post signs in their windows for Dutch letter cookies. However, the employee at Jaarsma Bakery explained that the S-shaped sweets are traditionally baked for Sinterklaasavond, or Dutch Santa Claus Day, on Dec. 6. For more seasonally correct snacking, she suggested an almond banket, a pastry similar to a letter cookie but with more almond paste and shaped like a flagpole.

Jaarsma Bakery opened in 1898, about 50 years after the Dutch immigrants arrived in Iowa seeking religious freedom. The Old World traditions still run deep. Since 1935, the town has held Tulip Time, a springtime festival celebrating the Netherlands’ flower power. The Vermeer Windmill, the tallest working mill in North America, soars nearly 125 feet high, its 82-foot-long blades whirring like a lazy fan. Five times a day, the Klokkenspel stirs to life with chiming bells and lively characters. There’s Dominie Hendrik Pieter Scholte, who led the 800 newcomers to the City of Refuge, and his wife, Maria, who is in tears after all but one of her good dishes shattered during the crossing. (She is also upset about her new digs, a log cabin.) Wyatt Earp earned a spot on the musical clock because the gunslinger grew up here. His childhood home is part the Historical Village, a collection of 22 buildings including the Werkplaats, where wooden shoes are made, and the Delft House, which contains vintage pieces of the famous pottery.

Continuing east, I left Pella’s self-described “Touch of Holland,” for the Willkommen mat of the Amana Colonies, a National Historic Landmark. Starting in 1855, German immigrants fleeing religious persecution (see Pella, with a Deutschland twist) established seven villages on 26,000 acres of land in central Iowa. They lived communally until the Great Change of 1932, when they split the shared nest for a more independent lifestyle. Today, about 1,600 people reside in the colonies, including 300 adherents of the Amana church, a breakaway sect of the Lutheran Church.

During the winter months, the historical buildings keep limited hours, but Jon M. Childers, executive director of the Amana Heritage Society, held the keys to the colonies. We visited the communal kitchen and the church in Middle Amana, and toured the exhibits at the heritage museum, which included the world’s first microwave and (empty) buckets of lard and barrels of pickled German cut beans from the subsistence days. Jon drove me by the 163-year-old Amana Woolen Mill, Iowa’s oldest and only working woolen mill, the site of a new boutique hotel that is scheduled to open in the fall. In between stops, he told me how as a Boy Scout, he provided “security” for Ted Kennedy, who visited during his 1979-80 run for president. (The boys encircled the former Massachusetts senator.) More recently, Obama and Hillary Clinton spoke at the Festhalle Barn about a month apart in 2007; a year later, Bill Clinton stumped for his wife at the Amana RV Park. He also picked up a blanket from a shop Jon had set up in the registration office, for those chilly nights in Chappaqua, New York. I asked Jon what could politicians learn from the Amana colonists.

“Amana is inclusive,” he said. “People sit and listen. It feels like a big family.”

In the fantasy baseball movie “Field of Dreams,” the voice said, “If you build it, he will come.” Meanwhile, the voice in my head said: “If you offer a house tour that doesn’t involve standing outside in freezing cold, she will come.” Someone clearly heard me.

I recognized the two-story clapboard farmhouse in Dyersville from a corn field away. It sat above the baseball field, which looked smaller in person. I buzzed the doorbell and a guide ushered me inside. After putting on protective booties, I followed her through the kitchen, where a photo of Ray and Annie Kinsella, the fictional field-builders, sat on the counter. In the living room, the 1989 film played on a boxy TV, the sound off to prevent the tour guides from going mad.

I learned all sorts of movie trivia, such as the actor who played the “voice” remains a mystery (maybe Ray Liotta or Ed Harris, the husband of Amy “Annie” Madigan?) and the corn grew so high, thanks to human intervention, that Kevin “Ray” Costner had to stand on a 12-inch platform. I stared out the bay window, a renovation care of Universal Studios, but didn’t see any ghost players emerge. Maybe they are waiting for Major League Baseball to finish building its regulation field adjacent to the FOD. On Aug. 13, the New York Yankees and White Sox will compete in Iowa’s first regular-season game to a crowd of 8,000. On this January morning, I had zero fans to cheer me. But I did have the voice in my head reminding me that the sooner I rounded those bases, the quicker I could return to my heated car.

Winter is prime time for viewing bald eagles in the Midwest. The birds of prey, which start arriving in September, hunt for food along Iowa’s major rivers. I started my search for the country’s emblem in the cafeteria of the National Mississippi River Museum & Aquarium in Dubuque. The restaurant overlooks Ice Harbor, a man-made offshoot of the Upper Mississippi. No luck on the birds, but even better, I found Jared McGovern, the museum’s curator of conservation programs, eating a chicken sandwich. Jared told me to look by the lock-and-dam systems along the Mississippi River, where eagles often feast on the fish uprooted by the rushing water. Plan B: Check the fields, in the off chance a farmer tossed a dead pig. Like many of us, eagles prefer fast food to a more labor-intensive meal made from scratch.

I followed Jared’s instructions, driving out to Lock and Dam No. 11 (nothing) and Eagle Point Park (maybe something) in Dubuque. Standing on the lip of the park above the Mississippi, I caught a glimpse of two dark-feathered birds (juveniles?) and a third with a white head (mom or dad?). I tried to snap a photo to send to Jared for confirmation but couldn’t free my hand from my mitten in time. Back in the car, I continued south on the Great River Road National Scenic Byway to Bellevue (Lock and Dam No. 12 and Bellevue State Park), Green Island and Sabula, the state’s only island city. In Davenport, seagulls circled Lock and Dam No. 13 and Canada geese pecked at the frozen banks.

The next day, I had moved on from the bald eagles; I now only cared about blankets. I had returned to Amana and was walking down the street when a mother exclaimed to her son, “Bald eagle,” and pointed at the sky. The little boy and I both looked up and watched the bird soar toward the setting sun. Tinted in golden light, the bald eagle looked regal and proud, even if he was just going to freeload in a farmer’s field.

I also spotted my button. A few hours before my flight back to Washington, I was drinking coffee at the Scenic Route Bakery in Des Moines when Jackson Boaz walked in wearing a “Students for Warren” pin on his wool jacket. The 15-year-old high school freshman from Northern California started every morning at the cafe with a cup of oatmeal. Iowa in January, he said, was “too cold for parfait.” The young campaign volunteer shared his impressions of the state with me.

“I love the energy here in Des Moines and in Iowa as a whole,” he said. “They have this sacred role as the first in the country. It’s like the political Super Bowl.” Anything else? “The food has been pretty dang good.”

Jackson was leaving in mid-January but hoped to return to Iowa for the caucuses – and maybe the oatmeal, too.

 

– Where to stay

Graduate Iowa City

210 S. Dubuque St., Iowa City

319-337-4058

graduatehotels.com/iowa-city

The downtown hotel celebrates Iowa City’s status as a literary powerhouse – the city is a UNESCO City of Literature and home of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and the Literary Walk – with stacks of books in the lobby and handwritten writings on the walls by local author Tim Taranto. The decor also incorporates other Iowa hallmarks, such as “Field of Dreams” and the Hawkeyes. Grab breakfast at Poindexter’s, a coffeehouse covered in more than 180,000 No. 2 pencils, or dinner and drinks at Gene’s, which is named after University of Iowa alum Gene Wilder. Rates from $119 a night include a coffee at Poindexter’s and discounted self-parking.

 

Hotel Julien Dubuque

200 Main St., Dubuque

563-556-4200

hoteljuliendubuque.com

The 19th-century hotel near the Mississippi River has hosted many storied guests, including Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain and Joe Biden, back when he was vice president. Al Capone also hid out here. The hotel feels like a period piece but with modern amenities, such as an indoor pool, spa, fitness center and the restaurant Caroline’s, which serves three meals a day plus happy hour specials. Rates from $94, with free parking.

 

The Current Iowa, Autograph Collection

215 N. Main St., Davenport

563-231-9555

thecurrentiowa.com

The hotel, part of the Marriott family, is the cool, artsy sister property to the sophisticated Blackhawk Hotel, where the Obamas stayed during a 2011 visit to Davenport. A gallery’s worth of contemporary art fills the hotel, including a giant cow named Betsy and a sculpture of a dog in a Batman costume. Stay put for meals and drinks: Try Viva Baja Mexican Bar and Restaurant in the lobby or the rooftop lounge, Up, which overlooks the Mississippi. Rates from $136, with free parking.

 

Where to eat

Eatery A

2932 Ingersoll Ave., Des Moines

515-282-8085

eateryadsm.com

The restaurant, which occupies the former space of Obama’s 2008 caucus headquarters, serves Mediterranean-influenced dishes, such as Spanish octopus, cauliflower and chickpea falafel, and pizzas baked in a wood-burning oven. Sit at the U-shaped bar and talk politics with the bartenders or settle into a booth surrounded by reclaimed wood from central Iowa. Small plates from $5; pizzas cost about $18.

 

Jaarsma Bakery

727 Franklin St., Pella

641-628-2940

jaarsmabakery.com

Stock up on Dutch pastries, breads, cakes and cookies, including Dutch letters, almond bankets and Dutch apple bread. The family-run bakery, open since the late 1800s, also sells Dutch products and souvenirs, such as Delftware and mouse-size wooden clogs. Danish pastries start at $1.15 each; Dutch letters cost $2.65 each.

 

Waveland Cafe

4708 University Ave., Des Moines

515-279-4341

wavelandcafe.com

The breakfast hot spot attracts a cross-section of Des Moines locals, including students, retirees and businessfolk, as well as politicians and journalists in town for the caucuses. Eat big with one of the skillets: The Waveland’s Best Skillet, for example, comes with ham, mushrooms, green peppers and hot peppers topped with melted cheese and served over hash browns with toast. Weekends are busy, so don’t press snooze on the alarm clock. Most dishes cost about $10.

 

What to do

Amana Colonies

622 46th Ave., Amana

319-622-7622

amanacolonies.com

Explore the seven villages, which offer a peek into the former communal society founded by German immigrants in the mid-1800s. Start with the Amana Heritage Society, which holds exhibits in a trio of 19th-century buildings. Then fan out to the shops (woolen mill textiles, brooms and baskets, and furniture and clocks), restaurants and outdoor activities, including a golf course and 3.1-mile bike trail connecting Amana and Middle Amana. There is also a brewery (not surprising) and a winery (surprising). Hours vary based on seasons and attraction.

 

Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum

210 Parkside Dr., West Branch

319-643-5301

hoover.archives.gov

The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, one of 14 presidential libraries run by the National Archives and Records Administration, honors the life and achievements of the only president from Iowa. The visitors center and historic site, which includes his two-room childhood home, a blacksmith shop and the Friends Meetinghouse, are free. The museum, which costs $10, covers his years before, during and after his presidency. Open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Follow the loop road from the library and museum to the gravesite of Hoover and his wife, Lou Henry Hoover. The grounds are open 24 hours a day.

 

Field of Dreams

28995 Lansing Rd., Dyersville

888-875-8404

fieldofdreamsmoviesite.com

Chase your own Ghost Players around the bases on the “Field of Dreams” site of the 1989 film. For movie trivia and other behind-the-scenes tidbits, take the half-hour tour of the 1906 farmhouse that Kevin Costner made famous. From December through February, you must book the house tour at least 48 hours in advance. Admission: $20. The ballfield is free and open during daylight hours.

Feathers fly in Nakhon Sawan’s Boraphet Marsh #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 18, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380723?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Feathers fly in Nakhon Sawan’s Boraphet Marsh

Jan 18. 2020
Oriental Darter

Oriental Darter
By Arthid Nima
Special to The Nation

Birdwatchers were delighted this month to come across a variety of migrating birds having a “party” at Bueng Boraphet (Boraphet Marsh), a semi-natural lake in Nakhon Sawan.

With swampy fringes, Bueng Boraphet is Thailand’s largest freshwater lake at more than 200 square kilometres and an obvious draw for almost 200 species of wild animals, birds and plants.

Eastern Marsh Harrier

Eastern Marsh Harrier

Purple Heron

Purple Heron

Pied Kingfisher

Pied Kingfisher

There to greet the visiting birds are 16 local species, such as the kingfisher, a resident of Thailand that’s not easily spotted and even less frequently seen up close.

 Small Pratincole

Small Pratincole

The “foreigners” in their midst at this time of year include the small pratincole, a grey-brown combination of dove, swallow and plover with a tan wash at the throat and chest.  It’s rare to see this bird even at its preferred beaches and swamps since its migrations never end.

Garganey

Garganey

The garganey, a small, shy dabbling duck, gathers in flocks of more than a thousand birds, though its numbers seem to be decreasing lately.

Eurasian Kestrel

Eurasian Kestrel

The Eurasian kestrel is a small falcon distinguished by its plumage – the male’s grey head, rusty back and grey tail with a broad black tip, and the female’s brownish above feathers and a bar on the back, wings and tail.

A quite common visitor to Boraphet Marsh, they can be spotted scouring growths of pampas field and amid farm crops.

Black Winged Stilt

Black Winged Stilt

The black-winged stilt is a large black-and-white wader prowling shorelines on long orange-red legs and a straight black bill. The best place to see them is in wetlands with open shallow water.

Black Winged Stilt

Black Winged Stilt

Northern treks: Chiang Mai’s gorgeous Wat Chan forest #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 18, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380722?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Northern treks: Chiang Mai’s gorgeous Wat Chan forest

Jan 17. 2020
By Supachai Petchtewee
The Nation

Few Thais have heard of the Wat Chan pine forest in Chiang Mai’s Kalayaniwattana district, but it’s a key supplier of farm goods used in the Royal Initiative Project founded by His Majesty the late King Bhumibol.

The Wat Chan Royal Project Development Centre in Ban Chan grows mainly fruits and vegetables specifically acclimatised to the area.

They’ve been carefully studied and developed to assure a match for the growing conditions before being sent to the Wat Chan Royal Project Foundation and introduced to growers, who also submit their own produce to the centre for quality assessment.

Unlike the foundation, the centre is under the supervision of the Royal Forest Department.

While my first visit to the pine forest at Wat Chan in 2018 was fleeting, I arrived this year planning to camp overnight. The temperature was cool even in the daytime, the wind constantly rustling leaves. I was 900 metres above sea level and quickly being charmed by the local people’s simple way of life and innate friendliness to travellers.

A sight not to be missed is the sun rising over a reservoir, and soon its beams slicing through the fog and striking the water, to be reflected among the trees.

There are several ways to reach Wat Chan, including private vans and minibuses that take four to five hours to get there from downtown Chiang Mai. You can find them parked at Chang Peuk Station.

More popular is the route from Pai in Mae Hong Son, right across the provincial border from Kalayaniwattana. It passes lovely strawberry fields.

If you have your own car, there are two routes to Kalayaniwattana, the first from urban Chiang Mai along Highway 107 to the Mae Malai-Pai intersection, left onto Highway 1095 and continuing about 15 kilometres into Pai district, then Kalayaniwattana for another 40km.

The other route runs from Chiang Mai to Samoeng district, then via Highway 1349 to Ban Chan sub-district, and you’ll see the pine forest.

I’ve travelled both routes and found them equally convenient and the experiences equally pleasant, with gorgeous views on both sides of the well-maintained roads.

Citybook eases the hassles of travellers across cities #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 17, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380664?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Citybook eases the hassles of travellers across cities

Jan 16. 2020
By THE NATION

Booking.com has unveiled its new pilot product, CityBook – a responsive digital guide for cities that seamlessly combines inspiration, planning, navigation and experience all in one place.

The international digital travel company launched the pilot project of CityBook in Paris, London and Amsterdam on Thursday (January 16).

CityBook will be fully focused on helping travellers once they have arrived in their destination by providing curated recommendations on things to do, showcasing local offers and discounts, providing content to help travellers get a feel for the city to help them make decisions, all with the purpose of helping Booking.com better understand most relevant issues for consumers in-destination.

The CityBook products, content and features that consumers like best will then be rolled into the core Booking.com app, furthering Booking.com’s vision to help customers in making decisions and provide simplicity throughout their entire travel journey.

Leveraging machine learning models that take into accounts a traveller’s location, the makeup of their group (family, couple or solo traveller), where they’re in their trip (first day vs the last day of the trip), as well as the weather and real-time availability, CityBook makes contextually-based recommendations to help travellers get the most out of their trip, including how to get back to their accommodation from any spot in the city.

The technology that powers CityBook brings together powerful trip research all into one place with instant recommendations, so there is limited need to plan extensively in advance.

“With CityBook, we want to put all the best possibilities for experiencing a city in the palm of your hand,” said Ram Papatla, Vice President of Experiences at Booking.com.

“Bouncing between dozens of sites and apps to get the best information and then still having to book everything separately is not the most enjoyable or seamless process. We want to help people focus on the fun part of travel planning – inspiration – and make the booking and organisation for a trip a snap, with actionable content that’s all bookable in a couple of taps and all conveniently organized in one place”.

“Based on how travelers engage with CityBook, it will evolve further with various features potentially being incorporated into the core Booking.com app.”

Whatever device or platform customers prefer, their trip experience is completely synced. Whether downloading the app for Android or iOS or simply visiting the web version of the CityBook site on desktop or mobile, once a customer has logged in with their Booking.com account details, they are set to discover, make plans and experience the city – all on their own terms.

CityBook is currently available in English for Amsterdam, London and Paris, with Tokyo, Paris, New York City, Berlin, Barcelona and Rome scheduled for launch over the coming months.

Frost at 1C: Chiang Mai catches a chill #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 17, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380657?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Frost at 1C: Chiang Mai catches a chill

Jan 16. 2020
By The Nation

There’ve been chilly mornings in Chiang Mai since the weekend, with the temperature averaging 14-20 degrees Celsius and never rising beyond 36.

At the lofty Kew Mae Pan Viewpoint on Doi Inthanon, though, the early-morning temperature last Sunday was a mere 1C.

The result was a carpet of frost – the frozen dew known in the North as “mei kab”.

At the peak of the mountain it was a relatively balmy 5C.

Doi Inthanon National Park chief Kritsiam Kongsri said plenty of sightseers were revelling in the experience.

“We’re expecting a lot of campers and we hope they’ll make sure their cars are in good condition, because any breakdowns could cause traffic jams,” he said.

“They should also make sure they bring warm clothing – it’s been cold here for many days.”

Prime chance to see thrilling Kanchanaburi caves #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 16, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380602?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Prime chance to see thrilling Kanchanaburi caves

Jan 15. 2020
By THE NATION

Two scenic caves in Kanchanaburi – one with colossal stalagmites – will be open to visitors from February 29 to May 4, but you need to register in advance by phone and be able to swim.

Lam Khlong Ngu National Park chief Satit Pinkul on Wednesday (January 15) announced the openings for Tham Sao Hin (Stone Pillar Cave) and Tham Nok Nang-aen (Swallow Cave).

Both are within the park in Kanchanaburi’s Thong Pha Phum district.

Advance registration for individual visitors up to groups of 10 is being accepted from February 3-7, daily from 1-3pm.

Visitors should be 15 to 60 years old and able to swim, since some areas of the caves are semi-submerged. They should be healthy, with no congenital disease or respiratory or blood-pressure issues.

Satit said this is the safest time of year to see the caves – Tham Sao Hin with stalagmites exceeding 62 metres in height and Tham Nok Nang-aen with its gorgeous subterranean vistas and thousands of nesting birds.

Pa Kia Highland becomes tourist draw #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 13, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380483?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Pa Kia Highland becomes tourist draw

Jan 13. 2020
By The NationSupachai Petchtewee
The Nation

Pa Kia Highland Agricultural Research Station under the Faculty of Agriculture, Chiang Mai University, has become increasingly popular among tourists to Doi Luang Chiang Dao, even though the site is located in remote land high up in the mountain.

The station provides a camping area and facilities, but visitors have to bring their own tents and bedding. Cottages are also available at the station but in very limited number.

People have to travel by pick-up truck or powerful bikes through a laterite road and up high slopes of the rocky mountain.

Despite a challenging time travelling there, visitors say it was certainly worth the effort, with the beautiful scenario of nature at day, especially the wild Himalayan cherry trees during winter, and clear starry skies at night.

A look at the western Virginia town that raised a forward-thinking first lady #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 12, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380435?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

A look at the western Virginia town that raised a forward-thinking first lady

Jan 12. 2020
Skeeter's restaurant sits on the ground floor of the building where first lady Edith Bolling Wilson was born. A museum dedicated to her is located at the center of the block. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

Skeeter’s restaurant sits on the ground floor of the building where first lady Edith Bolling Wilson was born. A museum dedicated to her is located at the center of the block. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee
By Special To The Washington Post · James F. Lee · FEATURES, TRAVEL 

A look at the western Virginia town that raised a forward-thinking first lady. I once heard Edith Bolling Wilson referred to as the “first female president” of the United States. I’ll admit I knew very little else about the former first lady and second wife of Woodrow Wilson until I traveled to Wytheville, Virginia, to visit her childhood home.

Skeeter's restaurant sits on the ground floor of the building where first lady Edith Bolling Wilson was born. A museum dedicated to her is located at the center of the block. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

Skeeter’s restaurant sits on the ground floor of the building where first lady Edith Bolling Wilson was born. A museum dedicated to her is located at the center of the block. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

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The Bolling family furnishings on display at the museum suggest a comfortable but not luxurious lifestyle. The household included 11 children as well as extended family. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

The Bolling family furnishings on display at the museum suggest a comfortable but not luxurious lifestyle. The household included 11 children as well as extended family. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

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During World War I, Edith Wilson volunteered with the American Red Cross, serving meals to U.S. troops traveling through Union Station. Her cap is among the items on display at the museum. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

During World War I, Edith Wilson volunteered with the American Red Cross, serving meals to U.S. troops traveling through Union Station. Her cap is among the items on display at the museum. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

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Edith Bolling Wilson was born on the second floor of this commercial building in Wytheville, Va. The Edith Bolling Wilson Museum is located on the ground floor. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

Edith Bolling Wilson was born on the second floor of this commercial building in Wytheville, Va. The Edith Bolling Wilson Museum is located on the ground floor. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by James F. Lee

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Edith Bolling Galt met Woodrow Wilson at the White House in March 1915, about seven months after the death of his first wife. They married on Dec. 18, 1915. Their whirlwind courtship and marriage shocked Washington, but Edith Wilson nonetheless threw herself into the demands of the White House. She was a very unconventional first lady for the time, young and fashionable and quite willing to be seen in public.

“She was kind of the Jackie Kennedy of her generation,” said Debbie Wilkerson, education coordinator at the Edith Bolling Wilson Birthplace Museum on Wytheville’s busy East Main Street.

Edith Wilson was born in Wytheville in 1872, in the upstairs apartment of what is to this day a commercial building. A restaurant, a boutique and the small museum where my wife, Carol, and I began our visit are on the ground floor. Upstairs, the Bolling family apartment is open for tours. Most of the artifacts and photographs in the museum were donated by the Bolling family and span Edith Wilson’s life from her childhood and first marriage through the White House years. The seventh child in a crowded household that included 11 children as well as parents, grandparents and myriad relatives, she received rigorous home schooling from her grandmother and parents, but only two years of formal education.

The Bolling family Bible notes family events, including Edith’s birth and her two marriages. Upholstered Victorian chairs, a tea set, a crib, and chinaware suggest a comfortable but not luxurious lifestyle. A photograph of somber, 3-year-old Edith wearing her brother’s hand-me-down pants reveals the family’s frugality.

Display items dating from the White House years include the watch worn by Woodrow Wilson during the Paris Peace Conference after World War I and the Red Cross cap she wore as a volunteer serving meals to U.S. troops at the Union Station canteen. On one of the family tables is a copy of her “White House Cook Book.”

In the second-floor lodgings where Edith Wilson was born, we heard an audio description of her childhood in the first lady’s own words. Today, the apartment shows years of neglect. The museum is undertaking a long-term restoration project that aims to re-create the apartment’s appearance at the turn of the century. Though it is mostly empty, we got a sense of the layout – a warren of rooms, some of which still have their original wallpaper and flooring.

During her childhood, Edith was caregiver to a demanding, invalid grandmother, Ann Bolling, tending to her throughout the day, even sleeping in her room at night. Every day she washed, starched and ironed a snow-white cap, an essential part of her grandmother’s attire. A family photograph on the back porch shows Grandmother Bolling wearing one of her caps, with Edith sitting dutifully at her feet.

Grandmother Bolling took great delight in the two dozen canaries kept in 16 bird cages on the upstairs back porch. The cages demanded daily cleaning, another of Edith’s chores, performed under the withering scrutiny of her grandmother. For Edith this was a most unpleasant task. A photograph of 13-year-old Edith sitting wistfully next to the cages perfectly captures her mood. She later wrote in her memoirs that she took an odd pleasure in conducting funerals when the little creatures passed away.

But life wasn’t all work. In the kitchen, Edith remembers her Grandmother Logwood’s Christmas coconut balls and her pralines with pecan nuts and brown sugar. Happy times were spent in the parlor where the family would play games or listen to her father read aloud from Shakespeare or Dickens.

Edith Bolling left Wytheville in 1890 at age 18 and married Norman Galt, a Washington jeweler, six years later. As a young woman, she blazed her own trail, traveling to Europe frequently, and becoming the first woman issued a license to drive an electric car in the District of Columbia. (Her 1904 license is now on display at the museum.) The Galts lived comfortably until his death 12 years after their marriage; the couple had no surviving children.

From the start, President Wilson shared everything with his new wife, including classified information and official secrets; he consulted her in matters political and governmental. She even encoded his private messages before they were dispatched. But it is the years after President Wilson’s debilitating stroke in October 1919 for which she is most remembered – and criticized. The president never fully recovered, becoming a virtual recluse and she his gatekeeper and caretaker, a role harking back to her years with Grandmother Bolling.

Rarely leaving his side, she determined which papers and other material received the president’s attention. She decreed who saw him, including the Cabinet. In her memoirs, she called this period the “stewardship” of the presidency, a stewardship that lasted until the end of Wilson’s term in March 1921 – 17 months! Edith Wilson said she didn’t make any decisions on policy. “The only decision that was mine was what was important and what was not,” she wrote in her memoirs.

Edith Wilson lived a long life, surviving Woodrow Wilson by 37 years at their post-presidential home at 2340 S St. NW. One year before her death in 1961, the former first lady, by then the sole survivor of her 10 siblings, made her final visit to Wytheville.

She had come to town to donate a stained-glass window to the St. John’s Episcopal Church where she was baptized, confirmed and first married. She stayed at the hotel across the street, which still stands (and where we, too, stayed the night before) and then ate at the restaurant that occupied the space that is now the museum. Before leaving Wytheville forever, she made a final tour of her childhood home.

We visited the church, lined on both walls with gorgeous stained glass. Edith’s gift, “Blessing the Children,” is still there in vivid color. The local girl made good, but didn’t forget her hometown.

With cues from a famed French critic, testing Lyon’s culinary eclat #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 12, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380434?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

With cues from a famed French critic, testing Lyon’s culinary eclat

Jan 12. 2020
Léon de Lyon - founded in 1904 by Léon Déan, whom esteemed food critic Curnonsky called a king of cooks in his 1935 guidebook - features a casual bistro, a gastronomic restaurant and a cozy contemporary bar. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

Léon de Lyon – founded in 1904 by Léon Déan, whom esteemed food critic Curnonsky called a king of cooks in his 1935 guidebook – features a casual bistro, a gastronomic restaurant and a cozy contemporary bar. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar
By Special To The Washington Post · Sylvie Bigar · FEATURES, EUROPE, FOOD, TRAVEL

With cues from a famed French critic, testing Lyon’s culinary eclat. Mention Lyon, France’s third-largest city, and Francophile food fans perk up. Thanks in part to its location at the heart of France’s agricultural larder, Lyon has always enjoyed a glowing reputation as a gastronomic hub.

The decor of Bouchon-Comptoir Brunet, a typical bistro, hasn't changed in decades and that's exactly what the owners prefer. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

The decor of Bouchon-Comptoir Brunet, a typical bistro, hasn’t changed in decades and that’s exactly what the owners prefer. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

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Red banquettes and art deco chandeliers adorn the elegant, historical dining room at Brasserie Georges. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

Red banquettes and art deco chandeliers adorn the elegant, historical dining room at Brasserie Georges. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

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But things heated up in 1935 with the release of a guidebook titled “Lyon, Capitale Mondiale de la Gastronomie,” penned by esteemed food critic Curnonsky with writer Marcel-Etienne Grancher. As famous for his poetic culinary musings as for his colossal appetite, Curnonsky (alias the Prince of Gastronomes) was one of the first writers to espouse the concept of culinary tourism.

In the children's section of the Cité, a kid-size kitchen features interactive exhibits such as this one about how to follow a recipe. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

In the children’s section of the Cité, a kid-size kitchen features interactive exhibits such as this one about how to follow a recipe. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Sylvie Bigar

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A map locating Lyon, France Photo by: The Washington Post — The Washington Post

A map locating Lyon, France Photo by: The Washington Post — The Washington Post

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So when I heard last year that Lyon was opening a so-called Cité Internationale de la Gastronomie, I climbed the ladder of my home library to seek the old guidebook. Six restaurants remained; a visit felt timely. I would hit each spot, discover the new Cité and consult a food historian: Could Lyon circa 2019 still claim the title of World Capital of Gastronomy?

– Brasserie Georges

“Curnonsky?” asked the maitre d’. “Table six!”

No Muzak here, only the happy chimes of silverware as I cruised along the immense art deco dining room, zigzagging between red moleskin banquettes and long tables covered with starched white tablecloths. Above my head, steel-and-glass chandeliers heralded the stylized ceiling fresco. And there it was – his name engraved on a copper plaque at table six.

Taking my cues from Curnonsky’s guidebook, I ordered the Incomparable gratinée and a brown, fatty choucroute escorted by ham, sausages and boiled potatoes. The gratinée, an exquisite onion soup, was thickened at the table with an egg yolk stirred in Madeira wine. Lightly acidic, the sauerkraut balanced the sweetness of the soup, while the plump meats yielded salty deliciousness.

– La Mère Brazier

As Lyon’s silk industry collapsed in the 1900s, bourgeois laid off their cooks. Finding themselves jobless, several women founded their own eateries and became known as Les Mères (the Mothers). In 1933, La Mère Brazier was the first woman to be anointed by the Michelin guide: three Michelin stars for each of her two restaurants!

Since 2008, Chef Mathieu Viannay has led her downtown historical restaurant, and while she remains his inspiration, the authentic but modernized interior, as well as his inventive variations on her recipes – and his two stars – are clearly his own. Describing her cuisine, Curnonsky mentioned simple perfection. Dare I say that Viannay’s 12th version of her foie gras terrine and artichoke heart came close? How long until his third star?

– Bouchon-Comptoir Brunet

The Brunet family is long gone, but current owners Xavier Beyrieux and Benjamin Baldassini are passionate about Lyon’s culinary legacy.

“For us,” said Beyrieux, “acquiring a 1934 bistro only makes sense if we keep everything as close to the original as possible.”

They kept the name, the original checkered floor tiles, similar marble tables and wooden chairs. The old bar collapsed, but the new one is its honorable heir. The menu still features tripe, sauce gribiche and cow’s udder with garlic, but Curnonsky called the escargots “a splendor.” Indeed, snails bathed in bubbly caramelized parsley butter tasted splendid.

– Léon de Lyon

Standing proud since 1904 on a downtown street corner and named for its founder, Léon Déan – a king of cooks, wrote Curnonsky – this elegant wood-paneled space was recently revamped and now features a casual bistro, a gastronomic restaurant and a cozy contemporary bar. A collection of classic paintings depict kitchen scenes and set the stage for chef Olivier Bourrat’s Lyonnais cuisine.

I was dying to experience the sum of gastronomical pleasures described by Curnonsky, but it was too early for liquor souffle. Instead, I savored another local favorite, the earthy pâté en croûte, a mosaic of chicken, veal, sweetbreads, pork and foie gras encased in a savory crust as crumbly and buttery as a shortbread.

– Brasserie Le Nord

A model of good taste and practical sense, said my guidebook about the decor (red painted walls, stone arches and mosaic tiles still hold). This bustling brasserie, part of the late Paul Bocuse’s empire, still churns out famous Lyonnais specialties among a pell-mell menu featuring linguine with mussels and Serrano ham.

Curnonsky mentioned the famous choucroute du Nord, but I opted for the massive saucisson pistaché, two hefty slices of pinkish saucisson studded with pistachios and stuffed into a delicious brioche.

– Le Passage

“Curnonsky who?” asked the young chef of Le Passage, a gorgeous bistro hidden within a traboule, the typical Lyonnais covered passageway between two streets. My guidebook referred only to a smart wine list, but the young owners were thrilled to see their locale mentioned in a 1935 book. No history buff here, but a solid contemporary menu and a modern cocktail selection at the theatrical bar.

– Cité Internationale de la Gastronomie

Once UNESCO inscribed the French gastronomic meal on its intangible cultural heritage list in 2010, France was required to create ways to safeguard that concept. Several cities broached the idea of institutions dedicated to gastronomy. Four won the golden ticket, each with a specific theme, and Lyon is the first to open. Dijon, Tours and Paris-Rungis will follow.

“It’s not a museum nor a restaurant,” said director Florent Bonnetain. “It’s an interactive cultural space focused on food and health, for gourmands of all ages.”

The Cité, 43,000 square feet of exhibit space over four stories, is housed within the renovated 12th-century Hotel-Dieu – once a monumental hospital, today a stunning complex – comprising a five-star hotel, restaurants, offices and shops. Whether a visitor follows their nose directly to the working kitchen or digs into the culinary personalities who marked the city – Bocuse’s old stove-top is there, Mère Brazier’s towering pots and even a cardboard Curnonsky – the center celebrates culinary culture.

Everywhere I went in Lyon, people were eating. Besides the historical joints, the city brimmed with new eateries, sumptuous pastry shops and busy wine bars. Finally, I asked Bonnetain if Lyon could claim the world title.

“There are many gastronomies today,” he said. “Lyon may not be the world capital, but it remains a capital, a center of French, Lyonnais cuisine.”

“Does Curnonsky still matter?” I asked culinary historian Yves Rouèche.

“He put Lyon on the map in 1935,” he answered, “but it was Paul Bocuse who promoted Lyon internationally. Now that he’s gone, the question is: Who will pick up the baton?”

– – –

IF YOU GO:

WHERE TO STAY

– Le Royal Lyon Hotel

20 Place Bellecour

011-33-4-78-37-57-31

lyonhotel-leroyal.com/en/home.html

Facing Bellecour Square, one of the largest pedestrian squares in Europe, the Royal features regal luxury in the very center of town. Students from the Paul Bocuse Institute, a top hospitality school, spend time in each department as part of their internship and bring candid, friendly service. Rooms from about $200 per night.

– Collège Hotel

5 Place Saint-Paul

011-33-4-72-10-05-05

college-hotel.com

In the heart of old town, this fun property revisits with humor the theme of an old-fashioned French school. Comfortable and design-centric, the rooms are on the small side, though some feature balconies, and the library serves as a wonderful hangout. Rooms from about $133 per night.

WHERE TO EAT

– Brasserie Georges

30 Cours de Verdun

011-33-4-72-56-54-54

brasseriegeorges.com/en

Near the Perrache train station stands this epitome of a French brasserie, founded in 1899. Lyon has changed and grown around it, but the beer is still homemade and satisfying, the choucroute is still the best in town, and the room still packs celebrities, locals and travelers. Open weekdays 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. and weekends until 12:15 a.m. Entrees from about $21.

– La Mère Brazier

12 Rue Royale

011-33-4-78-23-17-20

lamerebrazier.fr

Chef Mathieu Viannay has revived the old haunt of La Mère Brazier, the first woman to receive three Michelin stars for each of her restaurants. Classics such as the artichoke and foie gras terrine or roasted venison are revisited and enhanced. This historical institution, a worthwhile splurge, has become my favorite table in Lyon. Open Monday to Friday noon to 1:15 p.m. for lunch, 7:45 to 9 p.m. for dinner. Entrees from about $62.

– Bouchon-Comptoir Brunet

23 Rue Claudia

011-33-4-78-37-44-31

bouchonlyonnaisbrunet.fr/en

The small, bustling bistro in downtown Lyon specializes in simple Lyonnais dishes including offal, stews and goat cheese beignet. The wine list features numerous options by the glass and offers great value for local crus. Open weekdays except Tuesday noon to 2 p.m. and 7 to 9:30 p.m.; weekends noon to 2:30 p.m. and 6:30 to 10 p.m. Entrees from about $17.

– Léon de Lyon

1 Rue Pleney

011-33-4-72-10-11-12

leondelyon.com/fr

A historical restaurant revisited by a young team, Léon now features a gastronomic dining room and a casual cafe and bar within the old space. From bubbling marrow bones to delicate roasted pollock served with cockles, traditional French specialties are the focus here. Open daily noon to 2:30 p.m. and 7 to 11 p.m. Entrees from about $18.

– Brasserie Le Nord

18 Rue Neuve

011-33-4-72-10-69-69

brasseries-bocuse.com/en

One of Paul Bocuse’s brasseries, this busy spot caters mostly to a business crowd in search of a solid, no-fuss menu. Traditional local dishes share the spotlight with fusion-style specialties including sashimi, jamon Iberico and classic pasta. Open daily noon to 2 p.m. and 7 to 10:30 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays until 11 p.m. Entrees from about $18.

– Le Passage

8 Rue du Platre

011-33-4-78-28-11-16

le-passage.com

Hidden in a traboule, a typical Lyonnais passageway between two buildings, tThis hip establishment is divided into a fine-dining room, a bar and two private salons including a cigar lounge. On the menu: steak tartare, veal sweetbreads, fillets of bass and a lively cocktail list. Open Tuesday to Saturday noon to 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Entrees from about $21.

WHAT TO DO

– Cité Internationale de la Gastronomie

4 Grand Cloitre du Grand Hotel-Dieu

citegastronomielyon.fr/en

Nestled within the monumental renovation of the 12th-century Hotel-Dieu, a former hospital, this interactive museum dedicated to food, gastronomy and health occupies four floors. Cooks and chefs work all day in the demo kitchen and produce interesting bites for tastings. The exhibits are open daily 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and until 10 p.m. on Saturday. Tickets and tasting about $27, adult tickets about $13, ages 5 to 15 about $9, children under 5 free.

INFORMATION

– en.lyon-france.com

Off the beaten track — Chaiyaphum offers a different kind of tourism value #ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย

Published January 12, 2020 by SoClaimon

#ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/travel/30380433?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Off the beaten track — Chaiyaphum offers a different kind of tourism value

Jan 12. 2020
By Natthapat Teekachotekunanon
Special to The Nation

Though never famous as a great tourist destination, Chaiyaphum has always been a province worthy of a visit, especially during the New Year holidays.

The primary aim of my trip to this northeastern province was to make merit and be blessed at the Nong Bua Khok temple in Chatturat district. It is an old temple whose Buddha statue — called “Luang Por Petch” — and a model of the Buddha’s footprint, are sacred to the locals.

Also, I participated in the off-season robes offering ceremony, together with the local people. The ceremony urges people to contribute money to the temple.

As the temple or village liaison prodded the people to offer more by announcing “there is still time left for contributions”, more people get up to make their offerings. Some old people contributed more than once with smiles on their faces.

After the divine obeisance, I visited Par (aunt) Ti’s coffee shop, which was about half a kilometre distance from the Nong Bua Khok temple. The shop is a two-storey wooden house, and its owner, Aunt Ti, is 70 years old.

The owner told me and other customers that she had been selling coffee since 1969 — when the price of a cup was just Bt1.50. Today, she charges Bt20 per cup.

She likes to take photos with her customers, and asked me to take a photograph with her to show that I had visited her coffee shop.

Aunt Ti’s coffee is strong, sweet and creamy. But, if told, she can make coffee with different levels of sweetness.

From Aunt Ti’s, I headed towards Nong Dong temple. My aim in visiting the temple was to participate in “Fang Luuk Nimit”, or inauguration ceremony.

This ceremony is organised during the New Year, as workers come back from the city to spend time with their families.

The ceremony is organised to consecrate a Buddhist temple. A sacred marker sphere, or “Luuk Nimit”, has to be buried in the temple compound as a ritual.

Buddhist people believe that they should attend a temple inauguration ceremony at least once in a lifetime, because the participants will receive a lot of merit by taking part in this ceremony.

Several Buddhists from Chaiyaphum and nearby provinces flocked to attend this ceremony.

While the sphere is buried, devotees drop notebooks, pencils and threads in the sacred marker sphere’s hole in front of the “Ubosot”, or the temple’s main chapel. Dropping these items, it is believed, will make the person smart.

The participants cover the entire sacred marker sphere with gold leaves and make a wish for prosperity in life.

The last place I visited was the local community in Ban Phet sub-district. Its highlight is the almost 100-year-old wooden houses that are a great draw for tourists to take photos.

However, the number of houses with antique value are rapidly going down as most house owners have already renovated their houses with cement.

This community was located near the Bamnet Narong District Office with various shops and modern buildings to welcome tourists.

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