Living & Health

All posts in the Living & Health category

Learning by playing

Published November 16, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30378368?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

Learning by playing

Nov 15. 2019
By Kupluthai Pungkanon
Special to The Nation
Helsinki, Finland

2,040 Viewed

Based on the Finnish education philosophy for kids and adults alike, SuperPark Thailand is all set to make a splash

Finland’s education system has long been admired the world over, not least for its philosophy of “Playing is Learning”. By creating an encouraging atmosphere, schools advocate lifelong earning both inside the classroom and out, bringing sports and life skills into the equation for a well-rounded adulthood.

Bangkok kids and the parents will soon get to discover part of that Finnish philosophy with the opening on November 30 of global indoor activity park SuperPark Thailand on the 7th floor of Iconsiam.

The new SuperPark concept is large, airy and offers more than 25 fun, healthy, safe and energising activities under one roof.  It’s divided into three distinctive areas, the first being “The Adventure Area”, which focuses on exciting play activities for younger children and parents. Among them is iTeacher-Lu, an interactive edutainment game within the basic rectangular space with the games projected on the wall. Kids play by throwing or kicking balls to hit the targets. The iWall, meanwhile, consists of multiple cameras allowing an interactive and “AI” experience across multiple games. For Flying Fox, children are seated on 20-metre zip wires and crash into foams blocks (similar to the Angry Birds movie). Giant tube slides provide an exciting turn at the end with additional acceleration.  Also here is the Kid’s Adventure City featuring multipurpose wooden play towers with traditional play equipment and digital games, the Super Ninja (obstacle courses), Pedal Car Track, and much more.

The second area is “The Game Area”, where young visitors can serve and compete in immersive SuperTennis, a revolutionary tennis simulation system using sensors, projectors and a powerful computer system to simulate a real on-court scenario. Baseball 2.0 is the upgraded version and is only in available in Thailand. Youngsters can also challenge themselves with Robo Keeper, which was made famous by Lionel Messi and has been adapted for SuperPark. For youngsters that still have the energy, there’s a mini Street Basketball court where the hoops have sensors allowing the scoring to be completely automated so visitors can challenge their friends or parents.

The third area is known as “Freestyle Hall” and encourages teens to put down their smartphones and venture into super activities including Super Bigdrop, a tube slide that drops the rider into a Big Air Bag from seven metres. Other activities include the SuperClimb, Skate and Scoot World, Super Boxer (AI Boxing), and a Trampoline Platform. Last but not least, bringing chilly Finnish pursuits to Thailand’s heat, there’s Super Ski where everyone can learn the basics of skiing and

snowboarding in just a few days.

These exciting activities are the brainchild of former teacher and coach Juha Tanskanen, founder and global chief executive of SuperPark who, seven years ago decided to create a safe indoor activity park to align with the nation’s education principles. He brought in physical education teachers to advise on sports and activities that benefit both physical and mental wellbeing and thus help young people lead a more fulfilling life.

Mark Kumarasinhe, left, and Juha Tanskanen

Mark Kumarasinhe, left, and Juha Tanskanen

“We created SuperPark because, firstly, children nowadays don’t move enough and spend too much time playing computer games or on social media. Secondly, they aren’t many platforms where families can have fun together.  I wanted to make an indoor park that targeted a wide range of age groups and that meant a lot of activities – physical development for children, team building for adults, for example. We started in Finland in my hometown of Vuokatti, which is a family travel destination but which had only one small playground where the kids were happy to play but the parents couldn’t join in. That sparked the idea of SuperPark and it has become very successful. We’ve expanded throughout Finland to 10 parks and to Asia, namely Hong Kong and Singapore and now Bangkok,” he says.

“We would like visitors to experience Finnish culture and our education system. Kids learn by doing and move with joy. Maybe families will no longer need to belong to a sport club. They can come here, explore lots of things and also play sports. It’s the Finnish’s philosophy. We should make technology the learning tools. It’s the future of our kids; the ability to learn and innovate.”

SuperPark is very proud of its special environment. One of the big attractions, says Mark Kumarasinhe, chief executive of SuperPark Asia, is the knocking down of barriers.  “In the park, there are many barriers ready to be explored like climbing soft spot mountain, which even toddlers can do.  There’s also the Ninja track where kids learn that even if they are not successful at completing the entire course but can do the first part, the next time they come, they can try the second part. They are following the difficulty levels of the activities. We always give them free time to explore. It’s all part of learning that challenges take time,” he says.

“SuperPark is opening in one of Bangkok’s most famous shopping malls and will be one of the best parks ever. We’ll have everything that the other parks have plus a few activities unique to Bangkok. We’ll have the three areas: The Adventure Area caters to younger kids, the Game Arena has both traditional and digital sports, and the Freestyle Hall is packed with such challenges as the Trampoline platforms and the Ninja Warrior zone. It’s a great place for adults too. Safety is the top priority with the utmost attention to detail given to all design and technical aspects and every member of our staff is fully trained and qualified. So we’re really looking forward to welcome Thais to our

SuperPark.”

Find out more at http://www.superpark.fl/en or http://www.superpark.co.th and follow

SuperPark’s Thailand at http://www.facebook.com/superparkth

A mindset for sustainability

Published November 12, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30378230?utm_source=category&utm_medium=internal_referral

A mindset for sustainability

Nov 11. 2019
 Academic and former industrial designer Torvong Puipanthavong has taken up a new career as an agriculturist, turning his home into a sufficiency economy learning centre.

Academic and former industrial designer Torvong Puipanthavong has taken up a new career as an agriculturist, turning his home into a sufficiency economy learning centre.
By Kitchana Lersakvanitchakul
Special to The Nation

2,904 Viewed

Former industrial designer and lecturer Torvong Puipanthavong ditches the rat race to devote his time to the self-sufficiency philosophy.

Torvong has developed his land according the philosophy of His Majesty the late King Rama IX.

Torvong has developed his land according the philosophy of His Majesty the late King Rama IX.

The sufficiency economy philosophy, introduced in 1974 by His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej the Great, is an approach to sustainable development that espouses moderation, reasonableness and prudence as a development framework based on knowledge and virtue.

Torvong in his workshop

Torvong in his workshop

Over the years, it has been adopted by many Thais, one of whom, Torvong Puipanthavong, the former head of the Industrial Design Department and vice-dean of the Faculty of Architecture, King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang (KMITL) decided to make it his life’s work in 2015 and has never looked back.

“I was 46 when I retired and my friends and colleagues all thought I was mad to be giving up a steady income of almost Bt100,000 a month,” he says with a happy smile, adding that he is enjoying life on his Bt9,300 pension. “Once, I was a part of making furniture design become the most popular subject of the Faculty of Architecture and the most selected by students. As a result, the faculty earned Bt20 million.”

Torvong in his vegetable patch

Torvong in his vegetable patch

The son of a civil servant, Torvong, who is now 50, was raised in different parts of the country before the family settled down in Phetchaburi Province. As a teenager, he was sent to Amnuay Silpa School and his talent for art and architecture landed him a place in the industrial product design course of KMITL.

Torvong points to the canal that winds through his land.

Torvong points to the canal that winds through his land.

“As a student, I learned how to design everything from a toothpick to large items. When I graduated in 1993, I was approached by a major organisation but instead chose to work for a new company so I could learn from scratch. And learn I did – administration, marketing, psychology, and economics – as well as producing artistically beautiful designs that satisfied customers because they were also functional. All I thought of at that time was getting the maximum benefit,” recalls Torvong.

After working at the new company for a while, Torvong decided to further his studies. Short of cash, he opted to work as a lecturer at KMITL for four years and earned a scholarship for a master’s degree in industrial design at Central Saint Martins, the world-renowned arts and design college in London.

Coming home in 2001, Torvong was made head of the Industrial Design Department at his alma mater where he passed on his knowledge to students. Six years later, wanting more free time, he became a part-time lecturer and spent his leisure hours building a loft-style home suited to the Thai climate on a 3-rai plot belonging to his wife’s grandmother Lim in Phetchaburi’s remote Nong Ya Plong district.

Weekends, he would drive home and put on his farmer’s hat.

The 3-rai plot has been developed in line with the sufficiency philosophy.

The 3-rai plot has been developed in line with the sufficiency philosophy.

“At first, I planned to retire at 50 and spend my life surrounded by nature. One day, Asst Prof Pichet Sowittayasakun, the vice dean of the Faculty of Architecture, told me how he based on his work on the King’s philosophy and introduced me to Dr Wiwat Salyakamthorn, or Ajarn Yak as he is better commonly known, a faculty adviser who had been following the sufficiency philosophy on his own land for almost 20 years. After having a conversation with Ajarn Yak, I decided to do the same.”

After two years of learning the King’s philosophy from Wiwat, who is the president of the World Soil Association, an adviser to Agri-Nature Foundation, and a former Deputy Agriculture and Cooperatives Minister, Torvong was all set to go. “I created a mind map with everything I had learnt about the King’s philosophy with regard to natural agriculture, soil, water, forest, people and dharma.”

That’s not to say he has totally given up on design. These days he uses his talent in art and science to create a life that’s in total harmony with nature. He has set up the Phetchaburi River Basin Agrinatural Community (PAC) and turned his Ban-Rai-Yai-Lim home into a sufficiency economy learning centre.

“I still lecture but these days my subject is the sufficiency philosophy and I work out of this learning centre. That too was a suggestion of Ajarn Yak, who helped me develop my land according to the King’s ‘3 Forests, 4 Benefits’ philosophy. I believe that people today yearn for a simple and natural way of life,” he says.

Torvong participated in “The Power of Human Energy: A Journey Inspired by the King”, a project led by Chevron Thailand Exploration & Production in cooperation with Research and Development Institute of Sufficiency Economy Philosophy, the Agri-Nature Foundation, and KMITL which motivates people to acknowledge the importance of the recovery and development of the Pa Sak River basin in line with the King’s philosophy and local wisdom to sustainably solve the problems of floods and drought. Torvong is one of the driving forces in the Phetchaburi River Basin.

 “I really believe that the King’s philosophy is vital to the sustainable survival of the Thai people.” – Torvong Puipanthavong, former head of KMITL’s Industrial Design Department

“I really believe that the King’s philosophy is vital to the sustainable survival of the Thai people.” – Torvong Puipanthavong, former head of KMITL’s Industrial Design Department

“This project is very important to expand results of the King’s philosophy and serves as a guideline and an inspiration for everyone. The most important thing is the power of humans in helping each other to push it forward quickly. I believe in the power of unity,” says Torvong.

Torvong also respects the late King Rama IX’s teaching: “Our loss is our gain” meaning “our deficit constitutes our profit, or we incur a loss to reap a profit.”

“I would like to write a design textbook that relates the King’s philosophy to a new business system. I think it would be a new dimension of design,” says Torvong. “I really believe that the King’s philosophy is vital to the sustainable survival of the Thai people.”

A massage for a warrior

Published October 31, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30377906

A massage for a warrior

Oct 30. 2019
By THE NATION

1,523 Viewed

The Anantara Spa at the Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel is reaching back to a cherished period of history with the “Siamese Warrior Massage”, which will be available throughout November.

The combination of Thai traditional massage and yoga uses movements from muay thai, dance and medicine to promote overall health.

It mingles rhythmic massage, acupressure, gentle twisting and deep stretching to relieve tension and promote the balance of “qi energy” in the body.

All a-flutter in Nakhon Sawan

Published October 23, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30377668

All a-flutter in Nakhon Sawan

Oct 23. 2019
By Special for The Nation
Artid Nima

53 Viewed

edited Luci Several species of migratory birds can now be seen at Bueng Boraphet as Thailand’s winter approaches.

Bueng Boraphet or Boraphet Marsh is the largest freshwater swamp and lake in Thailand. It is spread over more than 200 square kilometres in Nakhon Sawan province and is home to almost 200 species of wild animals, birds and plants.

Veteran lensman Artid Nima refers to Bueng Boraphet as a lake of life and often heads to the area to snap the birds and aquatic animals living among the pinkish-red lotuses. He says that the cold temperatures in the north of Thailand draw thousands of migratory birds, making this time of year the perfect period for birdwatching.

A love for home and garden

Published October 23, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30377643

A love for home and garden

Oct 22. 2019
By The Nation

1,278 Viewed

The always popular Baan Lae Suan Fair 2019 is drawing eager shoppers to Challenger Halls 1-3, Impact Muang Thong Thani this week thanks an even bigger range of creative ideas than usual for both house and garden.

This year’s event, which has as its theme “Living Transformed”, continues through Sunday (October 27) and Rarin Ukapnan Punjarungroj, president of Amarin Printing and Publishing, is confident that the more than 1.8 million attendees expected will spend some Bt7 billion at the event.

Damrong Leewairoj, editorial director Baan Lae Suan, Magazine Group said that that some 3,200 booths are offering living improvements that will appeal to everyone along with plenty of creative new ideas to make use of what you already have and transform it to best answer your specific lifestyle needs.

World’s oldest barbershop promises pampering at Anantara hotel

Published October 2, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30376927

World’s oldest barbershop promises pampering at Anantara hotel

Oct 01. 2019
By The Nation

1,053 Viewed

A Truefitt & Hill barbershop will offer high-end cuts and shaves at the Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel, which enjoys an exclusive address on Rajadamri Road in the heart of Bangkok.

Established in 1805, Truefitt & Hill is the oldest surviving barbershop in the world, as certified by Guinness Book of World Records, and is recognised as the finest traditional gentlemen’s barber and perfumer in London. The company is famous for its close shaves, expert haircuts and attentive grooming, according to a Tuesday release.

At Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel, Truefitt & Hill offers all its celebrated grooming services, including the 45-minute “royal” hair cut, 20-minute beard trim and 30-minute head shave which uses a badger hair bristle brush to lift the hair for the closest possible shave.

Bangkok’s socialite gentlemen can delight in expert personal grooming sessions that include facial hair grooming, a 20-minute waxing of the ears, nose, eyebrows and cheeks, and a ear-cleaning done in the traditional Chinese-Thai style.

For a close shave, the 30-minute traditional hot towel wet shave uses pre-shave oil applied with a luxurious hot towel wrap, followed by a rich shaving cream and finished with a comfortable shave.

The 45-minute ultimate shaving experience offers all the pleasures of the traditional hot towel wet shave, along with a deep relaxing face massage.

Commenting on the opening of Truefitt & Hill at Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel, Daniel Simon, the hotel’s general manager, said that the values and service standards of the world’s oldest barbershop perfectly fit that of Anantara’s flagship Thai hotel to create intimate customer relationships. “We are delighted to welcome Truefitt & Hill to one of Bangkok’s most exclusive addresses and to offer our guests and patrons more world-class services”, Simon said.

Truefitt & Hill at Anantara Siam Bangkok Hotel is open every day, from 9am to 7pm.

Perfectly planned for quality living

Published September 11, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30376030

Perfectly planned for quality living

Sep 10. 2019
The scenery at Izumi Park Town, the Tapio Shopping Centre (left) and The Sendai Royal Park  where is next to the Sendai Izumi Premium outlets.

The scenery at Izumi Park Town, the Tapio Shopping Centre (left) and The Sendai Royal Park where is next to the Sendai Izumi Premium outlets.
By Parinyaporn Pajee
The Nation

346 Viewed

In this second part of the two-part series, the writer travels to Sendai in Northeast Japan to see how nature is being interwoven with urban development.

Leaving behind the forests and parks nestled in and around Tokyo’s business district, we head to Izumi Park Town – a 10 kilometres away from Sendai.

The Izumi Park Town is the sustainable residential area in Migayi Prefecture on which Mitsubishi started work some 50 years ago. The development was launched in 1969 when Mitsubishi snapped up some 10.74 square kilometres (6,712.5 rai) of forest land on the mountainside. The first stage of Izumi Park Town started in 1974 and Mitsubishi has been developing the area ever since, adding an industrial area and recreation zone to the housing areas.

Built from scratch, Izumi Park is now regarded as an ideal town with infrastructure and urban planning systematically designed to enhance people’s interactions and connections. The management of the town is carried out under mutual community rules while the development programme is designed to encompass almost every aspect of urban living ranging from living space to schools, industrial and business districts, as well as recreational areas and even hospitals, all designed to accommodate people of any age and gender. The most recent developments include the new shopping mall Izumi Park Town Tapio and Sendai Izumi Premium outlets.

This peaceful coexistence takes place under a set of rules developed to enable the town to operate with the benefits and interests of the community in mind while showing respect for each other. Community members are made aware of their role and responsibility to respect the rules, allowing this quality society to maintain its high living standards.

With a current population of approximately 25,000, the town has been systematically developed and is rich in green spaces. Houses are beautifully designed, surrounded by trees, public parks and golf courses as well as such facilities as shopping malls, supermarkets and outlets that accommodate the ever-increasing number of tourists. Visitors are mesmerized by the impeccably organised urban spaces, appropriately divided into four different zones from living, urbanisation, recreation and working.

Intersections are replaced by T-sections to avoid traffic incidents.

Intersections are replaced by T-sections to avoid traffic incidents.

In the Living area, the emphasis is placed on the design of roadways to enable the most effective functionality, which includes different types of roads with carefully calculated geometric designs that have minimal curves and take account of the disruption caused by private driveways. Intersections are replaced by T-sections to avoid traffic incidents and here, as elsewhere, priority is given to the inhabitants’ safety and well-being.

In addition, each residential project is required to have at least 30 per cent green space of the total spatial programme and provide a communal area to encourage public activities and interactions between community members.

A site visit of AP (Thailand) team including four students from AP's Open House and the press at Izumi Park Town.

A site visit of AP (Thailand) team including four students from AP’s Open House and the press at Izumi Park Town.

The design also takes care to ensure no sensibilities are offended by ensuring that the roofs are in cool tones and there are no fences, In the meantime, the town encourages the use of the community bus provided by Mitsubishi Estate that offers residents comprehensive services at a cheaper cost. Responsibility for the public and private space is shared between the Sendai City, the landowner, MEC (Mitsubishi Estate Group) and the Plant Committee to make sure every tree in the town gets the care it needs to thrive.

The highly urbanized town centre is home to the schools, public activities and shopping malls and surrounded by the recreation and activity areas that include the golf course, tennis courts and horse tracks.

The working zone is home to the business area, with the light industry and office zones systematically managed and properly separated from the heavy industry zone.

The housing area is designed to situate behind the trees area that help to reduce the noise from vehicles.

The housing area is designed to situate behind the trees area that help to reduce the noise from vehicles.

Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP (Thailand) ’s Corporate Strategy and Creation, is well pleased with the visits to Tokyo and Sendai, telling us that they inspire AP to adapt what they see in Japan into their upcoming projects.

“There are obviously a lot of differences between our two countries so there are things we just can’t do, like creating the concept of Izumi Park Town in Thailand. But there are also many things we can try, such as adopting the green environment design in housing projects both vertically (condominium) and horizontally (housing estate), the traffic design and also how to raise the community awareness,” he says.

“And we cannot adopt the same business model as Mitsubishi Estate has used for Izumi Park Town. Here Mitsubishi has developed phase after phase over a 50-year period and continues to do so. We, on the other hand, work from project to project.

“We don’t have a huge plot of land like Izumi Park Town, but what we can apply is how to develop different projects simultaneously in the same area serving different target groups and then try to turn these into a community,” he continues.

Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP (Thailand) ’s Corporate Strategy and Creation at the Izumi Park Town, Sendai, Japan.

Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP (Thailand) ’s Corporate Strategy and Creation at the Izumi Park Town, Sendai, Japan.

Vittakarn is also certain that the field trip is equally as beneficial to his students and the press.

“We bring our product development team to Japan too. While we can’t pick up and do in Thailand what we have observed from the field trips we’ve organised over the past few years, we carry the concepts inside our heads. When the Japanese start doing something, they do it

thoroughly and deeply. It can takes years to be successful and so forus it’s like a shortcut to learning.”

In the meantime, AP is also focusing on greening the environment. It is now working with the Big Trees Project in removing and relocating the big trees before clearing and construction begins whereas before it would simply have cut them down. The Big Trees Project’s arborist

and tree surgeon gives the guidelines on how to trim, cut or remove the tree properly. It is even sharing these ideas with its clients, bringing the project’s experts to teach people how to plant trees and take care of them.

See also thethe first of a two-part series on Mitsubishi Estate’s projects in Japan at  https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30376024

Living in the arms of Mother Nature

Published September 11, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30376024

Living in the arms of Mother Nature

Sep 10. 2019
By Parinyaporn Pajee
The Nation

334 Viewed

With a prime location between the Imperial Palace and Tokyo Station, it’s easy to understand why Marunouchi is one of Japan’s most prestigious and popular business districts.

Leading property developer AP (Thailand) loves the area too, recently leading the Thai media and four of its top Open House students to the heart of the Japanese capital to explore new ideas in land development through its Japanese partner Mitsubishi Estate, which owns and manages one third of Marunouchi, an area that’s home to more than 4,000 companies housed in 100 buildings and which draws some 230,000 workers every day.

This year, AP is focusing its attention on sustainability and looking at ways to bring a green ambience to the spaces in which we live and work. And ever since Mitsubishi Estate invested in AP Thai six years ago, the property developer has been organising field trips to Japan and adapting the ideas it gains from these visits to its developments in Thailand. Two key places are the Marunouchi business area in Tokyo and the Izumi Park Town, a town in Sendai which was built by Mitsubishi Estate and which is still being developed even though the first house was built 50 years ago.

The Cafe by Aman

The Cafe by Aman

Our first stop on the Tokyo leg of the visit is Mitsubishi Estate’s headquarters in Otemachi next door to Marunouchi where Takanori Murakami, deputy general manager of the company’s Urban Development Promotion Department, is on hand to explain in detail how a green environment including a man-made forest has been incorporated within the concrete skyscrapers in the Otemachi, Marunouchi and Yurakucho areas. He tells us about the short-term initiatives the company wants to accomplish in 2020 and its long-term plans it aims to complete by 2050 before we are heading to a site visit around the area where the small forest surrounding the Cafe by Aman. This is a popular spot among salaryman, a place to eat their lunch and take a break from the concrete jungle.

Takanori Murakami, deputy general manager of the company’s Urban Development Promotion Department, is on hand to explain in detail how a green environment including a man-made forest has been incorporated within the concrete skyscrapers in the Otemachi, Marunouchi and Yurakucho areas

Takanori Murakami, deputy general manager of the company’s Urban Development Promotion Department, is on hand to explain in detail how a green environment including a man-made forest has been incorporated within the concrete skyscrapers in the Otemachi, Marunouchi and Yurakucho areas

 

Over the last decade, Marunouchi has been undergoing a major facelift led by Mitsubishi Estate. Older office buildings have been replaced by new skyscrapers with offices on their upper floors and a variety of shops and restaurants on their lower floors. These newly opened

shopping and dining complexes have revitalised the formerly unexciting business district and are drawing an increasing number of non-business visitors too. This mecca of business is brought closer to nature through plants and trees that fill every vacant space including the

pillars of the buildings and the walkways.

During the Edo period, Marunouchi (literally “within the enclosure”) was located within the outer moats of Edo Castle and contained the residences of some of Japan’s most powerful feudal lords. During the Meiji Restoration, an old castle became the Imperial Palace and the

Meiji government decided to sell the land that had once been home to the residential quarters of those feudal lords to the private sector to encourage urbanization. Only Mitsubishi understood the government’s intentions and purchased all the land. Their conviction that a modern state required an international business centre opened the doors to the future of Marunouchi.  Ichigokan, which literally means the first building, was the first edifice to be constructed in this area by Mitsubishi Estate back in 1894.

The Ichigokan - the first building of Marunouchi area.

The Ichigokan – the first building of Marunouchi area.

 

The red brick townscape was designed by British architects and earned it the nickname ‘London block’. Tokyo Station opened later in 1914.

The Ichigokan was reconstructed and reopened in 2010 as a museum focusing on 19th-century Western art. The area has now grown to become the lungs of the city, bringing people and nature together into a seamless coexistence.

One of the best examples of green living is Ichigokan Plaza, which is home to countless species of plants that take turns to bloom depending on the season. A sizeable green space is provided for visitors to rest, relax and be immersed in the natural surroundings while the

space design and lifestyle aspects reflect the coexistence between urbanites, building construction, and large trees. One of the examples is The Cafe by Aman that stands out thanks to the minimal aesthetics of its design and decoration with massive transparent floor-to ceiling glass that look out to 3,600 sqm of urban forest.

Mitsubishi Estate’s residential arm brings nature to residential development through the Bio Net Initiative, which carefully chooses planting inside the project to harmonize with the surrounding area.

Launched in February 2015, the Bio Net Initiative has now been developed into 150 projects under the condominium brand The Parkhouse. The initiative was chosen as the winner of Good Design Award of 2015 and Excellence Prize of the Biodiversity Action Grand Prize 2015 for its environmentally friendly design with outstanding considerations of flora and fauna such as birds, butterflies, flowers and grasses. The Parkhouse exists as a part of natural ecosystem and the design takes into account the appropriate number of plants, and quantity of earth water, and wind required to match the holistic space of the project to ensure total harmony. Eighteen of the 150 projects have received the ABINC biodiversity certification from the Association for Business Innovation in Harmony with Nature and Community.

At the Ichigokan Plaza, the green landscape has been added and the area.

At the Ichigokan Plaza, the green landscape has been added and the area.

 

The site visit and details provided by Mitsubishi Estate, says Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP’s Corporate Strategy and Creation, shows the AP team, Open House students as well as Thai media how everyone can create a better place. For AP, he adds that the trip will inspire his team to adapt these concepts into their development projects.

“Since the real estate business needs to grow hand in hand with city development, we attach importance to improving and elevating living quality under our AP World vision. We seek to draw a blueprint of good quality of life for today and the future. Thus we have come up with

the ‘Grow’ philosophy which offers a master plan for sustainable development. Along with developing AP Group’s residential projects, we take into consideration functionality and convenience of residents in our space design and also aim to understand how urban people can live with nature, especially developing residences with green areas inside. We hope to offer another piece of the jigsaw for a perfect ecosystem that allows for the coexistence of urbanites, buildings, large trees and various ecosystems and makes life safe and sound physically and mentally from the inside out. We believe it will ensure quality living

for big-city residents,” he says.

Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP (Thailand) ’s Corporate Strategy and Creation

Vittakarn Chandavimol, chief of AP (Thailand) ’s Corporate Strategy and Creation

 

The concept has already been put into practice in AP’s new condominium project Life Sathorn Sierra, which is located just a few minutes walk from Talat Phlu BTS station. Designed as a prototype of sustainable, balanced vertical living, the project stands out for its Forest Park

in the City concept and is now available for sale.

This is the first of a two-part series on Mitsubishi Estate’s projects in Japan. The next feature will take readers to the Izumi Park Town in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, here https://www.nationthailand.com/news/30376030

Bang & Olufsen soars after chairman says he’s ready to sell

Published August 25, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30375320

Bang & Olufsen soars after chairman says he’s ready to sell

Aug 24. 2019
By The Jakarta Post

274 Viewed

Bang & Olufsen was on track for its best trading day since the beginning of the year after its chairman signaled that the beleaguered maker of luxury TVs and stereos is up for sale.

It’s not clear that B&O, which is based in western Denmark, has any potential suitors, but the comments by Chairman Ole Andersen to the Borsen newspaper were initially embraced by investors, who drove the stock up as much as 15 percent after the market opened in Copenhagen on Friday. As investors took a bit more time to think, B&O’s gains petered out, and the shares were about 2 percent higher after roughly an hour of trading.

“If we were to get an approach, then we’ll listen, but it would naturally also need to be discussed with the shareholders. We’re obligated to do that,” Andersen told Borsen. Asked whether such a scenario is now more relevant, given the latest developments at the company, Andersen said yes.

The comments come after a disastrous year for B&O, which even after Friday’s share-price gains is down more than 50 percent in 2019. B&O issued its most recent profit warning in June, when it said that sales were falling even faster than anticipated.

“We’re in a situation where we need a contingency plan, and we of course have one,” Andersen said.

Per Hansen, an investment economist at Nordnet in Copenhagen, said in a note to clients that “B&O’s challenge lies first and foremost in the fact that it can’t react fast enough and that it still has a high cost base.”

Andersen himself noted earlier in the week at the company’s annual general meeting that B&O had fallen behind in product launches. He also acknowledged that management had faced “considerable challenges” in pushing through the necessary changes to the sales and distribution network.

Hansen notes that the company “probably hasn’t had a recent offer made to it and it probably doesn’t have a long list of potential suitors that it can call.” Ultimately, discussing a possible sale is a scenario that he says “ought to have been explored earlier.”

“The last 12 month haven’t created any justified expectations of an imminent sale at a very high price,” Hansen said. “For investors it looks like the current best card to play is that the share price is historically low.”

Sparkle Roll

Investors may now be asking themselves why B&O’s board was so determined to fend off a 2016 takeover attempt. Back then, Sparkle Roll — a company controlled by Chinese billionaire Qi Jianhong — indicated it was interested in buying B&O as it built up a major stake. But Andersen rebuffed its overtures, referring to the uncertainty surrounding a potential bid. That was three years ago, when a B&O share cost considerably more than now.

Andersen has more time to focus on B&O these days, after being ousted from the head of the board of Danske Bank late last year in connection with a $230 billion money laundering scandal. His departure was forced through by A.P. Moller, the biggest shareholder in Danske. Andersen has also agreed to step down as chairman of food-ingredient maker Chr.

Over half of older workers want to continue full time: Survey

Published August 23, 2019 by SoClaimon

ศาสตร์เกษตรดินปุ๋ย : ขอบคุณแหล่งข้อมูล : หนังสือพิมพ์ The Nation

https://www.nationthailand.com/lifestyle/30375197

Over half of older workers want to continue full time: Survey

Aug 22. 2019
Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Manpower and Education Low Yen Ling (in pink blazer) observing a LifeWork course for mature workers with Centre for Seniors executive director Lim Sia Hoe (in pale grey, standing).ST PHOTO: TIMOTHY DAVID

Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Manpower and Education Low Yen Ling (in pink blazer) observing a LifeWork course for mature workers with Centre for Seniors executive director Lim Sia Hoe (in pale grey, standing).ST PHOTO: TIMOTHY DAVID
By The Straits Times

245 Viewed

About 25% prefer to stay in current jobs; Centre for Seniors urges more help in career planning

About a quarter of older workers want to work and stay in their current jobs, according to a survey of more than 400 workers released by the Centre for Seniors yesterday.

A separate study of around 300 older workers by the centre also showed that more than half wanted to continue working full time.

With such aspirations, the centre said more measures are needed to help older workers plan their careers, after Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong announced during the National Day Rally speech on Sunday that the retirement and re-employment ages will be raised.

He announced that the retirement age will go up to 63 in 2022, and eventually to 65 by 2030.

The re-employment age will also go up from 67 now to 68 in 2022, and eventually to 70 by 2030.

Centre executive director Lim Sia Hoe said: “Older people say they want to work longer but they do not know how to and what jobs are open to them. There can be mismatches between jobs and older workers because these staff can have certain requests, such as leaving work early. They require life coaching so they know where to go and what resources are available. They also need to know themselves and adjust their expectations.”

The centre, a non-profit social service agency, is helping to prepare such workers with its LifeWork course. The course, which can last from one to three days, provides a toolkit for older workers to plan and manage their work-life transition, addressing concerns of career, retirement, health and family at different stages of life, especially at critical age junctions of 55, 62 and 67 years old. Around 3,000 workers from about 40 organisations have attended the course since it was piloted in 2016. A small number of workers also signed up for the course on their own.

The centre also launched a job portal for older workers last year called Silverjobs.sg. The portal has around 40 age-friendly employers across industries, such as the food and beverage sector, security, community care, corporate and administrative roles, engineering and delivery services.

It will help to match employers with older workers in suitable roles.

The centre has also developed an employment pathway for mature workers, which includes preparing both workers and employers before allowing for a job trial to ensure the right fit for both sides.

These moves are in line with the recommendation by the Tripartite Workgroup on Older Workers that calls on employers to engage mature workers in structured career planning sessions.

Ms Low Yen Ling, Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Manpower and Education and a member of the workgroup, said: “We hope that employers in the private sector and seniors will also take time to reflect, discuss and talk about how to prepare older Singaporeans to enjoy longer, more productive careers.

“We have to get them talking about re-employment early and not just a year before – 55 is a good age milestone. Such conversations and plans will give employers and seniors time to build up the skills required and help the seniors to build confidence in case he or she is prepared to go into a second career.

“Employers are also generally more aware of the skills needed for the industry, so we hope the employer can guide employees into what courses they should go for, to prepare for career transitions.”

%d bloggers like this: